• The Expected One: A Novel (The Magdalene Line)
The Expected One: A Novel (The Magdalene Line)

The Expected One: A Novel (The Magdalene Line)

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Product Description A deadly political rivalry...an intricate love triangle...a religious revolution that changed the world When journalist Maureen Paschal begins the research for a new book, she has no idea that she is stepping into an ancient mystery so secret, so revolutionary, that thousands of people have killed and died for it. Two thousand years ago, Mary Magdalene hid a set of scrolls in the French Pyrenees: the Gospel of Mary Magdalene, her version of the life of Jesus and the events of the New Testament. Protected by supernatural forces, these sacred scrolls could be uncovered only by a special seeker, one who fulfills the ancient prophecy of L'Attendu -- the Expected One. As Maureen becomes immersed in the mystical lore of L'Attendu, the eerie prophecy of the Expected One casts a shadow over her life and work, and a long-buried family secret comes to light. Maureen's extraordinary journey takes her from the dusty streets of Jerusalem to the cathedrals of Paris to the rocky foothills of southwest France. To search for the scrolls, she must unravel clues that link history's great artistic masters, dynasties, and scientific minds. Ultimately, she comes face-to-face with Jesus Christ, Mary Magdalene, and a love triangle that changed the course of history in a deeply moving and powerful new gospel...the greatest story never told. About the Author Kathleen McGowan is an internationally published writer whose work has appeared on five continents and in at least fifteen languages. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three sons. You can visit her website at www.theexpectedone.com. Linda Emond's film credits include Stop Loss, North Country, and Across the Universe. Television credits include The Sopranos, all four Law & Orders, and American Experience: John & Abigail Adams. On Broadway she has performed in 1776 and Life x 3 (Tony nomination & Outer Critics Circle Award) and Off-Broadway in Tony Kushner's Homebody/Kabul (Obie & Lucille Lortel Awards).

Customer Reviews

Such a great bookKept me interested and felt like this was more a work of fact than fiction.Very healing for me too on profound levels. 5More than I expectedI didn t want to put this book down. I know it s listed as fiction but I had flashbacks to points in my life that were so startling I could do nothing but cry. I cannot wait to start book two. I m felt drawn to these books. I ve followed Kathleen McGowan for many years and have done my own research here and there. Excellent book. 5Awesome bookI bought this as a gift. I already have my own copy, which I loved, and I went on to read the other two books in the series. She really brings Mary Magdalene to life and not at all in a dull way. The book has mystery, intrigue, and it's a page turner. As for the comparison with Dan Browns book which came out around the same time - well I loved that one, too. There were similarities but they really weren't the same and I think Kathleen McGowan did a nice job of expressing the value of the feminine. Loved it! 5Expected too much, dissapointed, bad researchWhy the author refers to Jesus by name used by Arabic speaking Moslems? why not his original Hebrew, or Aramaic name, or is she wwanted to use Arbic form, that why not the version used by Arabic speaking Christians? This book was a huge disapointment.Wanted to like it, but...Mary Magdalene deserves a better treatment.Instead of giving a plot summary, I am pointing out author's mistakes, but not all of them, just sampling, too many of those, would make a chapter pointing them out.First issue: the research. For ex. art history: the author assumes that any Mary in red robes is Mary Magdalene, even if she looks like Madonna, Virgin Mary. Author argues that Madonnas are dressed in blue only. Here the Kathleen McGowan shows insufficient research:if she paid more attention to art history she would know that Virgin was dressed in navy blue, other blues, grey, red, white, imperial purple, red robe and blue mantle over, etc. It depended on time, the school, and aspect. For example Madonna in her humility aspect was dressed in blue. Red symbolized charity. Etc. etc.etc. McGowan info about identifying MM in any occasion of Mary dressed in red is spreading misinformation.Colors were quite a complex issue, and narrowing the iconography down as author did isn't historically accurate, and is ignorant. Iconography is not so simplistic to just identify Virgin Mary because the figure is dressed in blue, or Mary Magdalene because she wears red. Not so simple as the author and some people assume.Or the ring given to Maureen: McGowan describes it as something special. Yet deducting from the description, it is a common pilgrim ring, this type was produced en masse during the Middle Ages.Regular history, sample example: the Borgias were sweet people after all, just vilified? Really? Also Marie Antoinette saying :"let them eat cake!" It is an old gossip, most likely a piece of hostile propaganda, I give credit to the author, yet what is translated as "cake" in English is brioche in French, a different kind of baked stuff, not a cake, it is like sweet bread, if you are no familiar with it. French quote is "S'ils n'ont plus de pain, qu'ils mangent de la brioche." Also Marie Antoinette as the Shepherdess, because there was a fashion in Europe to live bucolic life. Pastoral life style, highly idealized and romanticized was continuation of classical tradition in Europe.Need to research history, not jump to conclusions because it is convenient.Writing: is quite like some old fashioned romance, spiked with many words like " magnificent," wonderful," on an on. The part of writings which deal with older material are better, but somehow read like Sylvia Browne's claims to retro-cognition. Browne also wrote a historical novel about Jesus.The Expected One reads like Harlequin romance of an old fashion, like not belonging to this era, but to the times of corsets and fainting chairs and excessive affect in women. There are also some kitschy moments too. The main character is kind of weak, needs to have things explained to her, and of course is courted by an ultra rich aristocrat who lives in a castle provides a golden dress for the ball and there she is treated like a queen, as she is the shepherdess, the Expected One. Sorry, but it reads like a juvenile dream of unleashing the inner princes, quite a navel gazing ego trip.Plot and hype: as this book was selling with the hype of the author being the descendant of the lineage coming from Mary Magdalene and Jesus, and the author said that the novel is partially autobiographical some passages felt like if the author was weaving: "here reader, I am the Shepherdess, the Expected One, the new leader!" Too much personal psychology revealed.Some passages were also lazy plotted: instead of inventing some thrilling moments, the author just lets the expected one to find what she needs to find after having a revealing vision. Quite conveniant device for a writer writing a thriller, but disappointing for a reader. Ending unfulfilling.Assumptions: for the name "Paschal," as the author makes a big deal out of it in the book, and it was part of "proven facts" while marketing the book.This name (also the form Pascal), is common in France, also in Southern France and the West of Italy. It derives from the first name: Pascal. Like the last names such as Davis, or Simon, etc. come from first names. Pascal means "born on Easter." Pascha is Easter. But Pascal being really a Cathar name in particular? No.You find in the Cathar country names like Bonhomme, this really a Cathar name!Poor Mary Magdalene. But I hope the skills of the author will develop. I read the Book of Love and, and was better written. So, maybe the last book is much better?This book being offensive? Yes, for insulting readers' intelligence, not for supposedly "controversial" subject matter. It makes quite high rolling claims, in reality is catering to people who are not well versed in art history, iconography, cultural history. 1Chose your masterThis book is not easy to assess. In a way it is a novel, but the postscript directly turns it into something else. Had it not been for this postscript, I would have awarded this book a higher rating. It may be somewhat verbose and predictable, but it was a pleasant read, without any real tension or love interests.Towards the end we are finally introduced to the Gospel of Mary Magdalene , which is exactly that, the gospel of Mary Magdalene, according to the author. The central theme of the four gospels, i.e. Jesus vicarious sacrifice, is absent. Also absent is any in-depth knowledge of Jewish first century culture. This is a pity, for it takes away from the believability of this gospel . The author obviously did a lot of research in Cathari history, but is looks as if she relied on Sunday school memories as far as the background to the gospels is concerned.As did Dan Brown, this author claims that the gospels were extensively edited in the time of Constantine. This, if it were true, would be rather convenient. There is actually no evidence for it, and plenty against it. In my observation it is not the bible believing people who are one-eyed and ignore historical evidence, but rather those who want to debunk the scriptures.Be that as it may, this book certainly held my attention. It was also, at times, quite funny, but I was not always sure whether the humour was intended or not. 3If you loved The Da Vinci Code you will love this book!I have tried to find a copy of this book for the past 3 years. It is a novel similar to The Da Vinci Code but about the discovery of the gospels of Mary Magdalene. It draws you in with twists and turns. Brought me to tears the same as when I first read it. A wonderful read which will leave you with questions and hope. Thank you for this book! 5The Expected One by Kathleen McGowanThis book had been recommended to me by a tour guide of 'ancient mysteries'while visiting France. I had read 'Holy Blood, Holy Grail' byMichael Baigent and Richard Leigh, who also uncover the theme and meaningbehind certain well known symbols. The mention of sacred geometry and leylines where cathedrals have been built. The masacre of the 'Cathars'at Montsegur. The mention of Freemason's. (French and Scot's) I am enjoyingKathleen McGowan's writing style and story telling. This book is engaging.I will buy another by same author, when I complete this one. She has done alot of research on the subject and discloses information that I did not know. I highly recommend to anyone who's interested in esoterica and ancient mysteries. 5Fascinating Subject ... But the writing was a little weak.I enjoyed reading this book, but it was, at times, tedious to get through. The best parts of the book were the recounting of the ministry and passion of the Christ through Mary Magdalene's eyes. Some of the modern scenes seemed formulaic and offered too many simple and easy answers. Still, the author has great insight and the revised story of who Yeshua of Nazareth was is very fascinating. 4True Strong OutStanding SisterHood !!!Thank u Kathleen!! I bow in deep admiration to your incredible work of setting male history into its place ! While creating a unspoken devine lineage of intelligent kind emphatic positive careing supportive Sisterhood of strong outstanding Women that have been utterly overlooked and totally neglected ! I read the book of LOVE first followed by the Poet Prince and at last as i was to curious to let it go the Expected one ! I looked up every painting and sculpture and was gobsmacked by the way Kathleen waeved all these timeframes together in such a transparent way.... from the first moment i was hooked and as i just finished reading this mindboggling story (due to the amount of information ) i cant wait to reread it all !!! 5DisappointingThis was recommended to me. The friend said she couldn't put it down. Mine was not the same experience. I found this book to be average at best. I did not like the main character. She seemed egotistical and rather flat. The book was so bogged down with pseudo-mystery, as in - something mysterious is happening but we're not going to tell you yet. Problem was I didn't care. It actually reminded me of a Scooby doo episode. You know how at the end there was always a post mortem on events and a foiled plan by bad guys? The actual method of writing was good, but the story just lacked anything interesting. The best parts were the flashbacks and visions the main character had. I will not be buying anymore books in this series. 3
See All Reviews
Shipment tracking ID will be provided after your product(s) is dispatched. The delivery date stated is indicative and subject to availability, payment authorization, verification, and processing. In case your product(s) is not delivered due to an incorrect or invalid address, we will not be able to process any claims. However, we will notify you if it is returned to us.
  • Return or exchange requests can be made within 10 days of the delivery date.
  • To return or exchange any items, please email us at info@directnine.hk, clearly mentioning your order number and our customer support team will guide you on the process.
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  • Orders can be cancelled before dispatch. If the order has already been dispatched, cancellation fees might be charged.
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  • The refund will not include the import duties or the cost of delivery or return postage.
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  • DirectNine reserves the right to alter and enforce this Return and Refund Policy at any time without having to serve a prior notice to users.
Description
Product Description A deadly political rivalry...an intricate love triangle...a religious revolution that changed the world When journalist Maureen Paschal begins the research for a new book, she has no idea that she is stepping into an ancient mystery so secret, so revolutionary, that thousands of people have killed and died for it. Two thousand years ago, Mary Magdalene hid a set of scrolls in the French Pyrenees: the Gospel of Mary Magdalene, her version of the life of Jesus and the events of the New Testament. Protected by supernatural forces, these sacred scrolls could be uncovered only by a special seeker, one who fulfills the ancient prophecy of L'Attendu -- the Expected One. As Maureen becomes immersed in the mystical lore of L'Attendu, the eerie prophecy of the Expected One casts a shadow over her life and work, and a long-buried family secret comes to light. Maureen's extraordinary journey takes her from the dusty streets of Jerusalem to the cathedrals of Paris to the rocky foothills of southwest France. To search for the scrolls, she must unravel clues that link history's great artistic masters, dynasties, and scientific minds. Ultimately, she comes face-to-face with Jesus Christ, Mary Magdalene, and a love triangle that changed the course of history in a deeply moving and powerful new gospel...the greatest story never told. About the Author Kathleen McGowan is an internationally published writer whose work has appeared on five continents and in at least fifteen languages. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and three sons. You can visit her website at www.theexpectedone.com. Linda Emond's film credits include Stop Loss, North Country, and Across the Universe. Television credits include The Sopranos, all four Law & Orders, and American Experience: John & Abigail Adams. On Broadway she has performed in 1776 and Life x 3 (Tony nomination & Outer Critics Circle Award) and Off-Broadway in Tony Kushner's Homebody/Kabul (Obie & Lucille Lortel Awards).
Reviews

Customer Reviews

Such a great bookKept me interested and felt like this was more a work of fact than fiction.Very healing for me too on profound levels. 5More than I expectedI didn t want to put this book down. I know it s listed as fiction but I had flashbacks to points in my life that were so startling I could do nothing but cry. I cannot wait to start book two. I m felt drawn to these books. I ve followed Kathleen McGowan for many years and have done my own research here and there. Excellent book. 5Awesome bookI bought this as a gift. I already have my own copy, which I loved, and I went on to read the other two books in the series. She really brings Mary Magdalene to life and not at all in a dull way. The book has mystery, intrigue, and it's a page turner. As for the comparison with Dan Browns book which came out around the same time - well I loved that one, too. There were similarities but they really weren't the same and I think Kathleen McGowan did a nice job of expressing the value of the feminine. Loved it! 5Expected too much, dissapointed, bad researchWhy the author refers to Jesus by name used by Arabic speaking Moslems? why not his original Hebrew, or Aramaic name, or is she wwanted to use Arbic form, that why not the version used by Arabic speaking Christians? This book was a huge disapointment.Wanted to like it, but...Mary Magdalene deserves a better treatment.Instead of giving a plot summary, I am pointing out author's mistakes, but not all of them, just sampling, too many of those, would make a chapter pointing them out.First issue: the research. For ex. art history: the author assumes that any Mary in red robes is Mary Magdalene, even if she looks like Madonna, Virgin Mary. Author argues that Madonnas are dressed in blue only. Here the Kathleen McGowan shows insufficient research:if she paid more attention to art history she would know that Virgin was dressed in navy blue, other blues, grey, red, white, imperial purple, red robe and blue mantle over, etc. It depended on time, the school, and aspect. For example Madonna in her humility aspect was dressed in blue. Red symbolized charity. Etc. etc.etc. McGowan info about identifying MM in any occasion of Mary dressed in red is spreading misinformation.Colors were quite a complex issue, and narrowing the iconography down as author did isn't historically accurate, and is ignorant. Iconography is not so simplistic to just identify Virgin Mary because the figure is dressed in blue, or Mary Magdalene because she wears red. Not so simple as the author and some people assume.Or the ring given to Maureen: McGowan describes it as something special. Yet deducting from the description, it is a common pilgrim ring, this type was produced en masse during the Middle Ages.Regular history, sample example: the Borgias were sweet people after all, just vilified? Really? Also Marie Antoinette saying :"let them eat cake!" It is an old gossip, most likely a piece of hostile propaganda, I give credit to the author, yet what is translated as "cake" in English is brioche in French, a different kind of baked stuff, not a cake, it is like sweet bread, if you are no familiar with it. French quote is "S'ils n'ont plus de pain, qu'ils mangent de la brioche." Also Marie Antoinette as the Shepherdess, because there was a fashion in Europe to live bucolic life. Pastoral life style, highly idealized and romanticized was continuation of classical tradition in Europe.Need to research history, not jump to conclusions because it is convenient.Writing: is quite like some old fashioned romance, spiked with many words like " magnificent," wonderful," on an on. The part of writings which deal with older material are better, but somehow read like Sylvia Browne's claims to retro-cognition. Browne also wrote a historical novel about Jesus.The Expected One reads like Harlequin romance of an old fashion, like not belonging to this era, but to the times of corsets and fainting chairs and excessive affect in women. There are also some kitschy moments too. The main character is kind of weak, needs to have things explained to her, and of course is courted by an ultra rich aristocrat who lives in a castle provides a golden dress for the ball and there she is treated like a queen, as she is the shepherdess, the Expected One. Sorry, but it reads like a juvenile dream of unleashing the inner princes, quite a navel gazing ego trip.Plot and hype: as this book was selling with the hype of the author being the descendant of the lineage coming from Mary Magdalene and Jesus, and the author said that the novel is partially autobiographical some passages felt like if the author was weaving: "here reader, I am the Shepherdess, the Expected One, the new leader!" Too much personal psychology revealed.Some passages were also lazy plotted: instead of inventing some thrilling moments, the author just lets the expected one to find what she needs to find after having a revealing vision. Quite conveniant device for a writer writing a thriller, but disappointing for a reader. Ending unfulfilling.Assumptions: for the name "Paschal," as the author makes a big deal out of it in the book, and it was part of "proven facts" while marketing the book.This name (also the form Pascal), is common in France, also in Southern France and the West of Italy. It derives from the first name: Pascal. Like the last names such as Davis, or Simon, etc. come from first names. Pascal means "born on Easter." Pascha is Easter. But Pascal being really a Cathar name in particular? No.You find in the Cathar country names like Bonhomme, this really a Cathar name!Poor Mary Magdalene. But I hope the skills of the author will develop. I read the Book of Love and, and was better written. So, maybe the last book is much better?This book being offensive? Yes, for insulting readers' intelligence, not for supposedly "controversial" subject matter. It makes quite high rolling claims, in reality is catering to people who are not well versed in art history, iconography, cultural history. 1Chose your masterThis book is not easy to assess. In a way it is a novel, but the postscript directly turns it into something else. Had it not been for this postscript, I would have awarded this book a higher rating. It may be somewhat verbose and predictable, but it was a pleasant read, without any real tension or love interests.Towards the end we are finally introduced to the Gospel of Mary Magdalene , which is exactly that, the gospel of Mary Magdalene, according to the author. The central theme of the four gospels, i.e. Jesus vicarious sacrifice, is absent. Also absent is any in-depth knowledge of Jewish first century culture. This is a pity, for it takes away from the believability of this gospel . The author obviously did a lot of research in Cathari history, but is looks as if she relied on Sunday school memories as far as the background to the gospels is concerned.As did Dan Brown, this author claims that the gospels were extensively edited in the time of Constantine. This, if it were true, would be rather convenient. There is actually no evidence for it, and plenty against it. In my observation it is not the bible believing people who are one-eyed and ignore historical evidence, but rather those who want to debunk the scriptures.Be that as it may, this book certainly held my attention. It was also, at times, quite funny, but I was not always sure whether the humour was intended or not. 3If you loved The Da Vinci Code you will love this book!I have tried to find a copy of this book for the past 3 years. It is a novel similar to The Da Vinci Code but about the discovery of the gospels of Mary Magdalene. It draws you in with twists and turns. Brought me to tears the same as when I first read it. A wonderful read which will leave you with questions and hope. Thank you for this book! 5The Expected One by Kathleen McGowanThis book had been recommended to me by a tour guide of 'ancient mysteries'while visiting France. I had read 'Holy Blood, Holy Grail' byMichael Baigent and Richard Leigh, who also uncover the theme and meaningbehind certain well known symbols. The mention of sacred geometry and leylines where cathedrals have been built. The masacre of the 'Cathars'at Montsegur. The mention of Freemason's. (French and Scot's) I am enjoyingKathleen McGowan's writing style and story telling. This book is engaging.I will buy another by same author, when I complete this one. She has done alot of research on the subject and discloses information that I did not know. I highly recommend to anyone who's interested in esoterica and ancient mysteries. 5Fascinating Subject ... But the writing was a little weak.I enjoyed reading this book, but it was, at times, tedious to get through. The best parts of the book were the recounting of the ministry and passion of the Christ through Mary Magdalene's eyes. Some of the modern scenes seemed formulaic and offered too many simple and easy answers. Still, the author has great insight and the revised story of who Yeshua of Nazareth was is very fascinating. 4True Strong OutStanding SisterHood !!!Thank u Kathleen!! I bow in deep admiration to your incredible work of setting male history into its place ! While creating a unspoken devine lineage of intelligent kind emphatic positive careing supportive Sisterhood of strong outstanding Women that have been utterly overlooked and totally neglected ! I read the book of LOVE first followed by the Poet Prince and at last as i was to curious to let it go the Expected one ! I looked up every painting and sculpture and was gobsmacked by the way Kathleen waeved all these timeframes together in such a transparent way.... from the first moment i was hooked and as i just finished reading this mindboggling story (due to the amount of information ) i cant wait to reread it all !!! 5DisappointingThis was recommended to me. The friend said she couldn't put it down. Mine was not the same experience. I found this book to be average at best. I did not like the main character. She seemed egotistical and rather flat. The book was so bogged down with pseudo-mystery, as in - something mysterious is happening but we're not going to tell you yet. Problem was I didn't care. It actually reminded me of a Scooby doo episode. You know how at the end there was always a post mortem on events and a foiled plan by bad guys? The actual method of writing was good, but the story just lacked anything interesting. The best parts were the flashbacks and visions the main character had. I will not be buying anymore books in this series. 3
See All Reviews
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  • Return or exchange requests can be made within 10 days of the delivery date.
  • To return or exchange any items, please email us at info@directnine.uk, clearly mentioning your order number and our customer support team will guide you on the process.
  • To be eligible for return, products must be in the exact condition you received them in. All packaging material must be undamaged and unused with the price tags intact.
  • Orders can be cancelled before dispatch. If the order has already been dispatched, cancellation fees might be charged.
  • Due to the nature of the products that we sell, we will not be able to replace or refund unwanted items if they have been opened or any seals are broken.
  • The refund will not include the import duties or the cost of delivery or return postage.
  • If your refund is approved, then it will automatically be credited to the original method of payment, within 7-10 days.
  • DirectNine reserves the right to alter and enforce this Return and Refund Policy at any time without having to serve a prior notice to users.
Delivery Policy
Shipment tracking ID will be provided after your product(s) is dispatched. The delivery date stated is indicative and subject to availability, payment authorization, verification, and processing. In case your product(s) is not delivered due to an incorrect or invalid address, we will not be able to process any claims. However, we will notify you if it is returned to us.

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