• Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)
  • Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)
  • Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)
  • Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)
  • Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)
Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)
Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)
Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)
Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)
Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)

Shure SE535-V Sound Isolating Earphones with Triple High Definition MicroDrivers (Bronze)

SKU:HA3NSBKT6
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HK$ 5,221.20
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HK$ 8,702.00
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  • -V designates the product's color variation (bronze).
  • Triple high-definition drivers deliver spacious sound and rich bass for cinematic audio in a convenient and portable package.
  • Detachable cable system enables multiple connectivity options for long-term device compatibility, upgrades, and ease of maintenance.
  • Sound Isolating design blocks up to 37 dB of outside noise for immersive listening no matter where you are.
  • Secure, over-the-ear configuration keeps earphones in place and cables out of the way for unmatched, long-wearing comfort.
  • Special Edition version (LTD) with a distinctly tuned frequency filter and a unique color scheme of red earphones paired with light gray 3.5 mm audio cable in shortened 46 length.
  • Clear SE535 model incudes standard 3.5 mm clear cable, volume control, premium carrying case, adapter, and fit kit with wide selection of sleeves for custom fit.
  • Wireless SE535 earphones (with a Bluetooth communication cable) are also available. Sold separately in 2 colors (Bronze: SE535-V+BT1, Limited Edition Red: SE535LTD+BT1).
  • Own wired Shure SE535 Earphones already? Convert them to wireless with the new Bluetooth-Enabled Cable (RMCE-BT1). Sold separately.

Customer Reviews

Pretty good, but...I really like these phones. They have an excellent, full-range response. I use them with a Sennheiser EW300 system, and they're great. HOWEVER, you only get low-end on them if they're well-sealed. I had leaky, smaller tip on them so I could hear the un-microphoned pared of the band (drums and bass) and the bass from my guitar and vocals disappeared.The reason I wouldn't give them five stars is that I got a pair of the new Westone AM30, and they just blow the 535s away in bass response, tonal quality, and have the added advantage of attenuated, ambient sound. If you're working in large performance venues where the whole band is coming through the mixer, and there are ambient microphones, these will work fine. However, if, like most musicians, you play in smaller places, there are better options.4Happy I purchased, but the Shure 215s still give them serious competition.I never thought I'd pay $100 for a set of in-ear earphones when I bought a pair of Shure SE215s several years ago. I'm still enjoying the 215s to this day, but the roll off on the high end was noticeable. I liked the comfort and the sound so much I wanted to try their bigger brother the SE535s to see if it improved on the high end. I wasn't disappointed - the 535s have a much better high end and a fuller mid-range. I really like them. However, there are some serious diminishing returns compared to their little brother. The 215s are 80% of the sound of these IEMs for about 25% of the price.5After 18 Months, I Can Write An Honest ReviewOkay so first of all, these IEMs are an investment. They're affordable as IEMs go, but for the price many people will do a double take. In my opinion they are totally worth it, and this is evident in the fact that I'll be buying a pair of SE 846s in a month.Presentation:Awesome packaging. Feels and looks like a premium product and you know that you've bought something that was crafted rather than assembled.Getting Started:Okay so first I'd suggest finding either rubber or foam tips from the sets provided that fit your ears. I go for rubber in the summer and foam in the winter, typically. After you pick these out it's time to start listening, but remember to choose your source carefully.What I mean by source is that if you're using a smart phone, use a nice one like an S9+ or something else that you can optimize audio output with. Some Samsung phones have DACs onboard, and they also have the option to boost audio quality. If you don't have a high quality phone, I'd suggest buying a FiiO DAC or some other DAC to clean up the source material you're listening to... Unless of course you're in the studio or in front of a turntable.Remember, new expensive headphones take time to open up. Give it at least 50 hours of listening before you gauge the sound reproduction of these IEMs fully.Functionality:Soundstage is excellent, even after 18 months I'm impressed to no end at times. With the foam tips especially you can tune out half a dozen drunken, crazy teenage girls on a three hour flight. These really saved me from losing my mind there, thanks Shure!The Cord:If you've spent $450 on headphones, drop another $50 - $100 on the best cord you can find. This will heavily boost the quality of your sound, and also help (in some cases) to gain more versatility. The cord that comes with these headphones will work, but it sucks. Shure could charge another $100 and provide a better cord, but I'd rather source my own.Conclusion:These headphones have survived a lot of travel and some light abuse. Despite thousands of hours of listening, there is no crinkling sound that I'd have with cheaper headphones. So to put it mildly, these are durable little guys that take a licking and keep in ticking.If you lose your stuff a lot, drop your stuff into water, don't care about sound quality, etc... Don't buy these. But if you can't wait to hear your music from a new perspective... These are a great way to go.5Crisp, clear sound, great for in-ear monitoring on stageI bought these earphones because I play electric guitar, and needed something good for in-ear monitoring. I had some older Shure earbuds, and those are good, but they don't have much bass. I was doing a recording recently, and was really struggling to hear the bass line. Not ok. So I did a bunch of research and decided on these. I think this was a good choice. Their sound is very clear, and covers the whole range. They are so forward and almost a little harsh that I find it a little difficult to listen to regular music with them, because they cause me some listening fatigue. I don't have this issue with my old earbuds, so that's a bit unexpected. However, I will say they are very clear, with crisp treble and good bass response. They are fantastic for in-ear monitoring of live music, which is what I got them for. So I'm happy. It was a good choice.The only thing I don't like about these is they are a little difficult to put on. They have a bit of a funny shape, and it takes some practice to figure out the right orientation to put them on. Once they're on though, they fit snugly, and they're comfortable. They come with an assortment of earpieces. I ended up choosing the yellow foam earpieces, which are comfortable and give me a good seal, which is critical for getting good bass. They come with a little zipper case. There is not too much cord noise when wearing them, which is nice.These easily get 5 stars.5Beautiful clear multilayered sound! Beautiful clear realistic multilayered sound! Super comfortable. I m a budding home recording artist, with a head injury that makes over-the-ear phones painful to wear. Being able to hear the subtleties of interwoven parts is so key to my work. If these weren t so expensive I would wear them everywhere. Love the interchangeability with cords. I ve tried the Klipsch headphones at the same price point. The klipsch had beautiful sound, but were heavy and very fragile feeling. These have equal if not better sound differentiation and superior volume control. They are also much more compatible with all my devices than the klipsch were. They are super comfortable for long sessions, and cancel out the noise, while still allowing you to hear your vocals and volume clearly.I m giving this 5 stars even though... As usual, Amazon s idiot packing department packaged them in an oversized box with insufficient padding for electronics (one small piece of deflated plastic). Thankfully, these do not seem to have been damaged during shipping by their incompetence, unlike 2/3 of the electronics I ve had to return to them due to crappy packing, resulting in product damage. FYI, Amazon s packing department doesn t care if your products are damaged during shipping, so just expect that you may have to return anything electronic at least once. Which is sad, because if they took more care with their shipping department, they would not have as many returns due to product malfunctions:( 5Balance is where it's at.After 15 years of hard use, my old shure e5's have given up the ghost (the stiff cable came apart at the headphone jack joint...it hasn't broken yet, but they're not long for this world). So, i ordered these to replace those beloved e5's.With the e5's i used modified triple flange earpieces (trimmed off the smallest flange, and trimmed the stem back a bit for best fit). On the new phones, much to my amazement, the stock earpieces fit just fine. I will experiement more with the others later (including modifying the triple flanges that come with these).Out of the box...lots of different options for earpieces. Again, i was shocked that the stock actually work so well for me...but everyone's ears are different, and plenty of options are provided, as well as a volume control, airline and 1/8" to 1/4" headphone adapters. Much appreciated.I only got them today, and went directly from listening to my e5's to these. Initial impressions: even not broken in, they're pretty familiar-sounding, with a bit less "crowded" mids/highs. Bottom seems about the same...that is to say, balanced. If you want brain-scrambling, over-the-top bass, these probably won't work for you.As with any piece of reasonably hi-fi reproduction gear, if you're playing a less than ideal sounding production/file quality through them, they'll just show how less-than-ideal it really is. Well done stuff will sound pretty good.They're not the be-all, and-all, and will update this review when they've "opened up" after burn-in, but as a replacement for my old e5's for mobile listening, i'm well pleased with them thus far.[A week in] I found the stock tips to end up losing seal a bit to easily. So...i modified the triple flanges, the same way i have been with the e5's for years. That is to say, i trim off the smallest flange, and trim the stem to about 1mm past the rim of the first flange's edge. As with the e5's, the seal stays more consistent for me. For general use, this works really well. For stuff like airline flights, you'll probably want to use the foam tips for the better isolation.Since these are on detachable cables, it's weird figuring out which is the left or right earpiece, as they swivel on the cable connection. I'm probably just an idiot and missing a marking somewhere that determines left from right...but it's sort of weird not knowing right away which is which.Still very happy with the sound, and actually use the inline remote to prevent destructive bending of the cable relief bit of the earphones' jack...since my phone was often in my pocket, this is exactly what lead to the breakage on my e5's. The extra bit of replaceable cable is nice to have.I'll be flying with it at some point over the next week, so...more thoughts forthcoming!5Keepers. I initially auditioned wireless Shure SE 215 s. I love the warm signature, powerful bass & immersive soundstage that they provide. I was so impressed, I immediately became interested in the entire Shure SE line up.Online research suggested that the notable upgrades in the Shure SE line up are the 535 s or the 846 s.Technical research indicated that if IEM s have multiple balanced armatures, they can deliver bass that s comparable to or exceptional to those that have dynamic drivers. Additionally, it is also noted that multiple BA s can deliver more separation & detail.I referenced the 846 s, as they promise sub woofer bass, so they re extremely enticing. However, @ $1K, they re beyond my personal value, for now. So, I deferred to the 535 s.Just as research indicated, by comparison, the 535 s sounded more emotional, powerful & detailed. The bass was clean & controlled. The mid s & high s were forward & clear.In short, I found the overall sound signature to be significant enough to choose the 535 s over the 215 s.Keep in mind, everything begins with the input. Having said that, the output depends upon the studio recording & your device. My primary genre is electronica music via Spotify premium. My device is an iPhone 8 Plus. Nonetheless, if the recording is mediocre, the 535 s sound mediocre. By that same token, if the studio recording is stellar, so are the 535 s, as I can literally feel & see the music. It s a completely immersive & entertaining experience, if the recording is proper.My only concerns rests with the Bluetooth cable. I wish that the charge port was on the battery instead of the control button. I also wish that the battery had some sort of disconnect. However, the monitors disconnect, so there s that.In conclusion, with the exception of cost, there s really nothing wrong with the wireless 535 kit. So, cost is the only reason I rated them four stars instead of five.Notes: 1) The grey, medium, silicon tips offer the best seal & isolation in my experience. 2) The 215 s are the best value in the SE line up. 3). SE s sound even better when wired to a headphone amp.Choose wisely. 4Compared the Shure SE425, Bose SoundTrue Ultra in-ear, the Shure SE215, and the Shure SE535. Chose SE215 and switched to SE535Bose IE2i and Bose AE2I had a pair of Bose IE2i to listen to music when in my office, studying, running, gym, etc. I also had a pair of Bose AE2 that I used to play my electric drum set. I got tired of the IE2i and stopped using them altogether because those do not isolate any noises whatsoever. Like the new Bose SoundSport the earphone tips/buds are extremely comfortable, but you can hear every single noise from outside. I tried to use the IE2i in several 5-hr flights and they are useless. The AE2 sounded very good and isolated some noise. Enough to enjoy using them with my drumkit, but not enough to use on a plane ride.SE425Fantastic mid-range, poor bass and low-end; low impedance; long and strong cord; ability to replace only the cord if broken. Very comfortable behind-the-ear cord and position on the ear with great noise isolation. Given their lack of low-range these could not satisfy my needs. Expensive.Bose SoundTrue Ultra in-ear STIEGreat balanced sound; strong bass; short and thin/flimsy cord; includes iPhone controls. Very comfortable silicone tips that provide great noise isolation, but you can hear the cord touching against any surface. Easy and fast to take on/off. The earphones wiggle a bit when running, though not enough to break the sound seal. Relatively expensive.SE215Great balanced sound; strong bass; low impedance; long and strong cord, ability to replace only the cord if broken. Very comfortable behind-the-ear cord and position on the ear with great noise isolation. I can hear comfortably with 2/16 volume bars from the iPhone. Used 5/16 volume bars on the iPhone when running with 15 mph winds and was amazing. After a learning curve, you get used to quickly putting them on/off. Inexpensive.OverallI got the SE425 first and discarded them for their lack of bass. I couldn't notice much of a sound difference between the STIE and the SE215. The SE215 have a lower impedance and thus sound louder but the quality is, to me, quite comparable (My suggestion: get a tight seal, don't go too deep into your ear). The benefits of the SE215 suit my overall needs better and ended up choosing these.Notes1. I will post this same review in all three products hoping others will find it useful.2. I am traveling in a couple of days and if I find a good store in an airport that will let me try the SE535 I will make an update to this post. The SE535 are supposed to be as good as the SE425 with the bass that the latter so deeply lack.******UPDATE******A store at the Chicage O'Hare airport let me try the SE535. Here is my short review:SE535Fantastic balanced sound; great bass and low-end; low-enough impedance; long and strong cord, ability to replace only the cord if broken. Very comfortable behind-the-ear cord and position on the ear with great noise isolation. Many eartips to try for different occassions (e.g. biking, office, airplane). I can hear comfortably with 2/16 volume bars from the iPhone. With 3/16 volume bars on iPhone 5S the sound is astonishing, lead guitar doesn't sound over rythm guitar, bass and drums sound great and all sounds are complimenting one another as opposed to fighting over which is the primary sounding one. I use them for running, biking, skating, working out, in the office, at the library, coffee shop, in the car (passenger), on airplanes, and with my Roland TD30-KV electric drumkit. I never need more than 4/16 volume bars on my iPhone 5S. I specially like the versatility of these IEMs and quality of their sound. Expensive.I sincerely hope you find this review helpful!5Abysmal quality from a company tha couldn't care less.These IEM s sound great and fit comfortably, but that is where the good qualities end. I bought these in ear monitors at the same time as a hard case made by Otterbox. The case is so sturdy I can literally stand on it without any deformation or damage at all. I cared for these IEM s with with every possible precaution, gentle treatment, and careful use. When I wasn t using the IEM s they went directly into the otterbox case. I take care of everything I buy because I want to enjoy my purchases for, well, forever. I was using these headphones on a hot summer afternoon, took one out of my ear, reinserted it and it never worked again. There must have been a tiny, undetectable film of sweat in my ear which made its way into the guts of the IEM. To this day they look like they were just removed from the box, but only one works. The other sounds muffled with a very low volume. These IEM s are beyond fragile. I buy a *lot* of electronics and other things from Amazon and I can say without a doubt that these IEM s are at fault. I have many other pairs of headphones which all work like new...except one other pair - Shure SE 846 s. Guess what the problem with those is? One guess. Yep, a tiny bit of sweat and one IEM stopped working. Coincidence? Unlikely.1great sound but its complicated I really wanted to love these as I have heard so many good things. This was a big purchase for me so I was committed to giving them a fair shake. The sound quality is great, I don't think anyone who has the proper fit would disagree with that. My issues lie in the convenience area:1-changing cables between BT/standard is tricky, could result in damage, your fault.2-changing ear pieces, slightly tricky, could result in damage, your fault as well.3-fiiting in the ear takes time, same goes for removal, not fun when you are approached at work or on the train4-I use mac, so if I want to plug into iphone, adapter required, or $99 cable, same for lightning port $99, and even more for BT 5.0 $150.5-They seem to really struggle with crappy source file, much more than others. I would love to listen to vinyl with an amp all day but in reality I just don't. Most of my music is via phone or laptop, sometimes with a dac/amp if I am organized.6-I need to jump into Skype calls at work often and it would be great to do that but I did not have much success.Overall they sound very good but feel antiquated when it comes to daily use during real life, commute/office/home.All of these factors just make it too expensive for me, maybe a true audiophile would enjoy them more than me. When I had the choice I would always choose my B&W PX's, the sound is better (opinion) and the convenience factor is not even in the same league. Hope this is helpful to someone. 3Shure SE535 vs Etymotic ER4XR vs Etymotic hf3I felt compelled to write a review of these IEMs having obsessed about them for months now.They are all very good!They should be for the price! Haha.So where do I begin?Most important, above all is sound quality.They are all good with certain signature differences.I have been using Etymotics for years.Using the Etymotic hf3.Excellent overall. Very accurate. Just not a lot of punch or presence to the bass.It's there but doesn t hit you over the head.I tried other brands of phones and found them to sound inaccurate or sloppy.I had some older Shure IEMs and I wanted to see if their newer models sounded better.I tried the Shure SE315. and the Shure SE425.Didn t sound as good as my old model. Back they went.Decided I would need triple drivers to get a significantly better sound.Bought the Shure SE535. Lots of money!And wow! Very impressive!Having come from the Etymotics, the sound is very different.Its warmer and slicker sounding. The voice range is a little less forward, which may be simply because the bass presence and detail is huge compared to the Etymotics.The Shure SE535s are very entertaining to listen to.More so than the Etymotics.With the Shures, you feel more like you are being washed with music.With the Etymotics, it just feels more like you are analyzing the sound.There is way more punch and space to the sound in the Shure SE535s. Almost too much punch on certain tracks. Let me go back to the Etymotics.I tried out the Etymotic ER4XR and the Etymotic ER4SR.Very little discernible difference. Maybe slightly more bass presence with the XR.I have been using the Etymotic hf3 for many years.In my opinion, the hf3 sounds as good if not better than the ER4XR.The reason is that the ER4XR has a higher impedance than the hf3.On an iPhone, you have to turn up the volume essentially all the way to get the full sound out of the ER4XR.This is not the case with the hf3s. They are good at 3/4 volume.Makes a significant difference!Other than that, there is maybe a slightly discernible improvement in separation on the ER4XR. But I mean slight.Overall the hf3 sounds better. And they cost way less!And there is another point.Comfort.This is a tricky issue when it comes to IEMs.After trying to use the triple flange cone tips, I gave up do to discomfort and the scariness of sticking a little plastic Christmas tree up your ear canal.I found that using the cylindrical foam tips created just as good a sealed fit and bass response as the "tree" did. So that is what I use.The Soft Flex Sleeves are also an excellent alternative. Really good isolation and amazing bass response!That brings me to the difference between the Etymotics and the Shures.The Etymotics are simply more comfortable.The drivers are smaller and weigh less than the Shures. Less of a pull on your ear structure.Shures design is supposed to route the wire over and behind your ear.I find this distracting and annoying in addition to being uncomfortable.My solution is to let the wires remain in front of my ears, hanging down in front of me.Much more comfortable. (See photos)This however, necessitates using a shirt clip to cancel out the weight of the cord pulling on your ears. I bought some from Amazon. Works well to make the phones as weightless as possible.With the Etymotics, this is less of an issue because the earpieces weigh so much less and the foam goes straight into your ear canal.The Shures have to kind of sit on your ear structure. Not so comfortable.I'm hoping over time that I will be bothered less and less by this slight pressure.It is worth it to get the sonic results that the 535s deliver.Back to the Shures.I payed a very large amount for the 535s. For me they are worth it for the spectacular performance they deliver. I can only imagine how nice the Shure SE846s sound.I just couldn't bring myself to spend one thousand dollars on IEMs. I do after all have a family to support! So I am happy I have both.I will probably usually use my 535s for my daily commute to Manhattan.But it's nice to switch out to the Etymotics for a lighter more Spartan sound signature.Hope this review helps some of you out there.With streaming music, it's like being a kid in a candy store every day.And with these headphones, You can hear the candy really really well! Edit to this review: October 9, 2016This is an important addition to this review!I made a discovery about the importance of source input to the performance of the se535s.I had been listening to my music with Apple Music.I had been detecting a slight stridency to the overall sound of the headphones.Thought it was the phones.But then I tried using Spotify Premium with the 535s.No stridency!Virtually perfect reproduction of vocals, piano, strings, bass!As much as it pains me to say it, looks like Spotify delivers a more accurate dynamic signal.Both great music systems. But Spotify has a slightly warmer, more realistic sound.Wow!5it's like a concert on your headI'm an audiophile that likes to get out and walk around while listening to music, so I've always aimed to get the most I can out of portable equipment. Using my iPhone 6 Plus with Spotify and Tidal Lossless, I listened through a pair of Beyerdynamic DT-990s (250ohm) powered by a FiiO E12 I carry around in my back pocket. This setup, for me, remains unbeatable in terms of audio quality; it's like a concert on your head. But unforeseen circumstances made me seek out my first pair of IEMs in a long time.The last IEM I owned was the Klipsch Image S4, a popular one at the time that was widely praised for sounding 10x what it cost. But I knew I'd need something at least as good as my DT-990s if I really wanted to be satisfied; or at least, I'd need something that could give me that "Wow" when a song comes on I haven't heard before and I can hear every detail.I'll tell it to you straight, if you're a fan of open-back headphones - hell, any headphones that sit on your ears at all - odds are you aren't going to find an IEM that can live up to that experience, at least not without paying an insane price for it. At $500, the Shure SE535 should be the headphone that at least meets you halfway, and I can say that it just about does. But this is not an IEM with that "Wow!" factor.. actually it seems to be an actively anti-"Wow" pair of headphones. Take these out of the box and (after fiddling for several minutes) get them in your ear, the first thing you'll notice: they're damn comfortable for IEMs, mostly thanks to their smart but annoying design by which they basically hang on your ears. Now, turn on your favorite song, here it comes!... annnd... fizzle. Wait... what is this? Is this what I paid $500 for..? Are you kidding me?! This is the point where you have to have a little patience, giving your brain time to adjust to the new sound and the headphones time to show you what they can really do. Two words that should be printed on the bottom of the box: Keep Listening. Play song after song, and oddly enough, you'll find they start sounding better and better, and the SE535's character really starts to come out. The most forward, gorgeous rocking mids I've heard in probably any pair of headphones. The highs are so wonderfully detailed and flavorful, when singers hit those super high notes that would normally make you cringe in fear of pain, you instead feel an almost orgasmic sensation in the center of your brain, like their voice is reaching all the way into your brain and bouncing around in your skull. The lows and bass are understated, but certainly there, and they come out when they need to.. but hardly ever otherwise. This kind of sound profile actually has the unusual effect of making old, say pre-1940s vinyl recordings and mono mixes, sound amazing; listening to Jimmie Rodgers yodeling T For Texas sounds like having him right in front of you (don't let him sneeze on you). I was impressed by how much character these IEMs have, despite my initial disappointment that they didn't live up to my (perhaps absurd) expectations. All in all, I'll just break it down into pros and cons, so you can decide for yourself whether these are right for you in 2015.Pros:-Quite comfortable, and the box includes a ton of different ear tips to choose from. The box, by the way, includes many useful accessories, like cables and a well built hard case that can easily fit in your pocket.-Orgasmic mids and highs-Great soundstage for an IEM with good isolation as well, a rare combination.-Full of character, but not overstated; the music sounds fun, without compromising the detail.Cons:-Same design that makes it so comfortable makes it incredibly annoying to put on, as you have to lay the cord over your ear; this becomes profoundly more irritating if you have long hair.-Lows are understated and this seems to cost on sharpness and detail; instruments, for example, are more difficult to tell apart despite the 535's good soundstage. Bass is there, but has little punch or character.-A little too expensive for what you're getting. But this is also the best IEM I've ever owned, and I haven't owned many.Recommendations:I strongly recommend using an amplifier with the 535. It will bring out MUCH more detail and really push the IEMs to their full advantage. Not all headphones, particularly IEMs, benefit from amping but these definitely do. The lacking of bass can be corrected entirely with a proper amp, and the 535 handles a thumping bass excellently. I'm using the FiiO E12 I was using previously with my DT-990s, which is sort of overkill for a pair of IEMs, but it does sound heavenly- just be sure to be careful with the volume on any amplifier, as the 535's are low impendence and don't need much juice to get them going.4Best earphones, but disappointed that for the high price the in-line volume control doesn't work with Galaxy S7 Edge These are my third Shure earphones. First purchase was the SE530PTH back in 2010. Upgraded to SE535-CL in 2012. I fly a lot and usually on long flights (10+ hours) and found these to be the best for sound, comfort, and for blocking out all the noise on a plane. I like that they are in-ear and not over the ear like other noise-cancelling headphones. I often fall asleep on a plane while listening to music. I can get comfortable and twist and turn and not have to worry about what position my head is in. I've tried the Bose and Sennheiser earbuds and think the Shure are much better for sound and fit.Shure's customer service is great. Over the past 8 years I've only had a couple of issues. Fortunately, it happened while the earphones were covered by their warranty. Shure replaced earphone assemblies without any hassle. I lost my SE535-CL last week and had to get them replaced before my next trip. I decided to pay $50 more to get the limited edition SE535LTD because they have a slim volume control in the photo on Amazon. The SE530PTH I bought back in 2010 had volume controls, but they were very bulky.The SE535LTD comes with 2 sets of cables. One has the slim in-line volume controls and one with a single button for "Media phones". There's isn't a cable with no controls. First improvement I noticed were with the new cables. They aren't as stiff as the SE535-CL cables and there's a nice bend in the connector (see photo). The bent connector rests comfortably on my ear, and the softer cables go over and behind my ear without having to tug on them. With the previous cables I had to occasionally tug them down to keep them over my ear. It comes with a bunch accessories including different sleeves, an adapter for the 2-pin plugs found on some aircraft, and an analog volume control. I used them for a couple hours with my Galaxy S7 Edge and, as expected, they sound great.That being said, I can only give the SE535LTD 4 stars. I'm annoyed that for the super high price, Shure still doesn't include a cable with in-line volume controls that work with Android phones. One cable has only one button and is meant for placing calls (no volume controls). The other cable with the in-line volume control buttons only work with iPhones. I understand that back in 2010 iPhones had these fancy features and the Android phones didn't. It's 2018 and you can get in-line volume controls with cheap $10 earbuds, but I can't get them in my $500 Shure earphones? The analog volume control Shure provides is clunky and it's on a short "leash" (see photo). I would like to control the volume without having to pull my phone out my backpack or coat pocket. I would give the SE535LTD 5 stars if it wasn't for the lack of a good volume control option. 4Incredible sound from a tiny device I've had my eye on the Shure SE846 for a long time, but it's hard to justify spending close to $1k on an IEM I'll only use when I travel with my iPhone. Even worse; with the SE846, I'd be tempted to buy a Chord Mojo DAC for another $600, making my setup even less portable. With the SE535 however, my Audioquest Dragonfly Black is perfectly adequate, or perhaps I'll eventually give Shure's RMCE-LTG a try once they solve the problems with durability.The Shure SE535 costs about half as much as the flagship SE846 IEM, but scores only slightly lower in most IEM reviews. The main difference is that the 846 has an extra driver, which vastly improves low-end bass. If your tastes tend toward hip hop, that might be important to you - but serious audiophiles generally care more about accurate music reproduction, and in that the SE535 really excels. Not that I don't appreciate the presence afforded by an open low-end, but I'm not likely to notice it while riding a bus or subway.Even without a full sub-bass, the SE535 provides an exceptionally flat frequency response over the full range of human hearing. Music reproduction is crisp and accurate, and the array of ear tips provided virtually ensures a good, comfortable fit. Sound isolation is excellent and call quality is adequate. The SE545LTD only comes in red, which looks outstanding. The included BT1 bluetooth module is kind of a waste but it doesn't add to the cost, so I consider it basically a throw-away module that one might save for when they absolutely, positively must have wireless. Since it doesn't use Apt-X or ACC, sound quality with bluetooth is sub-par - but newer compatible bluetooth modules are readily available, including the BT2 from Shure. Still, a wired connection just plain sounds better. 5Excellent but probably not worth the moneyI've been using Shure in-ear earphones for a little over a decade, starting with the E2C, then the SE315, and now the SE535. I enjoyed my E2C pair so much but I wore out the over-the-ear memory cable resulting in a need to get something new. Having been on a tight budget about 7-8 years ago, I went with the SE315 but felt like those were a step down from the E2C. I used the SE315 pair until I recently lost the entire left earpiece from the detachable cable. So, now with some disposable income, I went back and forth between the SE425 and the SE535 and selected the latter.I've now had the SE535 pair (matched with an EarSudio ES100 bluetooth receiver/amp and a 2.5mm MMCX balanced cable) for about 3 months of moderate/casual listening time and couldn't be happier. Looking back, I'm not sure I'd do all that again, though. Like anything, there's a point of diminishing returns and I simply do not have the ears, time, or ability to care that much about getting the sound THIS good. I could have easily been just as happy with the SE425 and Shure's matching bluetooth cable for about half the price.As compared with the SE315, they're a little larger in size but they sound quite a bit better. The low frequencies the SE315 sometimes lacked the SE535 bring more forward, but in a very musical way. They're certainly not "boomy" and won't do justice to urban or EDM stuff with lots of heavy, hard-hitting bass. With the right setup, they're EXCELLENT at anything acoustic and you'll hear subtle detail that you might have missed on lesser setups, including some of the best home (and, arguably, studio) rigs.There are a few keys to getting the best performance out of the SE535, though, as I mentioned above. First, you'll need to make sure you get a good seal with the ear tips. If you don't have that, everything else you do and have won't to you any good. Personally, I find the large rubber tips to work best for me. However, the package includes a number of sizes of different types of tips, including expanding foam, rubber gasket, and a single pair of tri-flange earplug-style tips. Try them all until you get a comfortable fit AND a good seal in your ear. The next step up is to get custom ear molds done by an audiologist. It'll give you the best fit and you'll never have a problem with a seal. However, this option is quite expensive and would really only be needed by someone that can't find a good, comfortable fit with the existing ear tips (or a professional who would be getting the SE845 or something MUCH more custom, in general). Second, you'll want a good system to power the SE535s. Most smartphone headphone amps aren't going to do a good enough job. Also, most older bluetooth adapters, even Shure's older BT1, pair at a lower quality connection that will be obvious if you're using good enough equipment through the rest of the chain (and I did when switching from the SE315 to the SE535). Shure's BT2 would probably be a minimum to use with the SE535. However, I went with a 2.5mm balanced MMCX cable and the EarStudio ES100. It's got a powerful amp that really brings out detail in a way I haven't heard, even on my elaborate, studio-grade setup at home.Anyway, if you have the money for them, and the supporting equipment to really make them shine, you will be VERY happy with them. If you're just looking for a pair of earphones for casual listening, the SE425 is probably a better choice for your money.5
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Description
  • -V designates the product's color variation (bronze).
  • Triple high-definition drivers deliver spacious sound and rich bass for cinematic audio in a convenient and portable package.
  • Detachable cable system enables multiple connectivity options for long-term device compatibility, upgrades, and ease of maintenance.
  • Sound Isolating design blocks up to 37 dB of outside noise for immersive listening no matter where you are.
  • Secure, over-the-ear configuration keeps earphones in place and cables out of the way for unmatched, long-wearing comfort.
  • Special Edition version (LTD) with a distinctly tuned frequency filter and a unique color scheme of red earphones paired with light gray 3.5 mm audio cable in shortened 46 length.
  • Clear SE535 model incudes standard 3.5 mm clear cable, volume control, premium carrying case, adapter, and fit kit with wide selection of sleeves for custom fit.
  • Wireless SE535 earphones (with a Bluetooth communication cable) are also available. Sold separately in 2 colors (Bronze: SE535-V+BT1, Limited Edition Red: SE535LTD+BT1).
  • Own wired Shure SE535 Earphones already? Convert them to wireless with the new Bluetooth-Enabled Cable (RMCE-BT1). Sold separately.
Reviews

Customer Reviews

Pretty good, but...I really like these phones. They have an excellent, full-range response. I use them with a Sennheiser EW300 system, and they're great. HOWEVER, you only get low-end on them if they're well-sealed. I had leaky, smaller tip on them so I could hear the un-microphoned pared of the band (drums and bass) and the bass from my guitar and vocals disappeared.The reason I wouldn't give them five stars is that I got a pair of the new Westone AM30, and they just blow the 535s away in bass response, tonal quality, and have the added advantage of attenuated, ambient sound. If you're working in large performance venues where the whole band is coming through the mixer, and there are ambient microphones, these will work fine. However, if, like most musicians, you play in smaller places, there are better options.4Happy I purchased, but the Shure 215s still give them serious competition.I never thought I'd pay $100 for a set of in-ear earphones when I bought a pair of Shure SE215s several years ago. I'm still enjoying the 215s to this day, but the roll off on the high end was noticeable. I liked the comfort and the sound so much I wanted to try their bigger brother the SE535s to see if it improved on the high end. I wasn't disappointed - the 535s have a much better high end and a fuller mid-range. I really like them. However, there are some serious diminishing returns compared to their little brother. The 215s are 80% of the sound of these IEMs for about 25% of the price.5After 18 Months, I Can Write An Honest ReviewOkay so first of all, these IEMs are an investment. They're affordable as IEMs go, but for the price many people will do a double take. In my opinion they are totally worth it, and this is evident in the fact that I'll be buying a pair of SE 846s in a month.Presentation:Awesome packaging. Feels and looks like a premium product and you know that you've bought something that was crafted rather than assembled.Getting Started:Okay so first I'd suggest finding either rubber or foam tips from the sets provided that fit your ears. I go for rubber in the summer and foam in the winter, typically. After you pick these out it's time to start listening, but remember to choose your source carefully.What I mean by source is that if you're using a smart phone, use a nice one like an S9+ or something else that you can optimize audio output with. Some Samsung phones have DACs onboard, and they also have the option to boost audio quality. If you don't have a high quality phone, I'd suggest buying a FiiO DAC or some other DAC to clean up the source material you're listening to... Unless of course you're in the studio or in front of a turntable.Remember, new expensive headphones take time to open up. Give it at least 50 hours of listening before you gauge the sound reproduction of these IEMs fully.Functionality:Soundstage is excellent, even after 18 months I'm impressed to no end at times. With the foam tips especially you can tune out half a dozen drunken, crazy teenage girls on a three hour flight. These really saved me from losing my mind there, thanks Shure!The Cord:If you've spent $450 on headphones, drop another $50 - $100 on the best cord you can find. This will heavily boost the quality of your sound, and also help (in some cases) to gain more versatility. The cord that comes with these headphones will work, but it sucks. Shure could charge another $100 and provide a better cord, but I'd rather source my own.Conclusion:These headphones have survived a lot of travel and some light abuse. Despite thousands of hours of listening, there is no crinkling sound that I'd have with cheaper headphones. So to put it mildly, these are durable little guys that take a licking and keep in ticking.If you lose your stuff a lot, drop your stuff into water, don't care about sound quality, etc... Don't buy these. But if you can't wait to hear your music from a new perspective... These are a great way to go.5Crisp, clear sound, great for in-ear monitoring on stageI bought these earphones because I play electric guitar, and needed something good for in-ear monitoring. I had some older Shure earbuds, and those are good, but they don't have much bass. I was doing a recording recently, and was really struggling to hear the bass line. Not ok. So I did a bunch of research and decided on these. I think this was a good choice. Their sound is very clear, and covers the whole range. They are so forward and almost a little harsh that I find it a little difficult to listen to regular music with them, because they cause me some listening fatigue. I don't have this issue with my old earbuds, so that's a bit unexpected. However, I will say they are very clear, with crisp treble and good bass response. They are fantastic for in-ear monitoring of live music, which is what I got them for. So I'm happy. It was a good choice.The only thing I don't like about these is they are a little difficult to put on. They have a bit of a funny shape, and it takes some practice to figure out the right orientation to put them on. Once they're on though, they fit snugly, and they're comfortable. They come with an assortment of earpieces. I ended up choosing the yellow foam earpieces, which are comfortable and give me a good seal, which is critical for getting good bass. They come with a little zipper case. There is not too much cord noise when wearing them, which is nice.These easily get 5 stars.5Beautiful clear multilayered sound! Beautiful clear realistic multilayered sound! Super comfortable. I m a budding home recording artist, with a head injury that makes over-the-ear phones painful to wear. Being able to hear the subtleties of interwoven parts is so key to my work. If these weren t so expensive I would wear them everywhere. Love the interchangeability with cords. I ve tried the Klipsch headphones at the same price point. The klipsch had beautiful sound, but were heavy and very fragile feeling. These have equal if not better sound differentiation and superior volume control. They are also much more compatible with all my devices than the klipsch were. They are super comfortable for long sessions, and cancel out the noise, while still allowing you to hear your vocals and volume clearly.I m giving this 5 stars even though... As usual, Amazon s idiot packing department packaged them in an oversized box with insufficient padding for electronics (one small piece of deflated plastic). Thankfully, these do not seem to have been damaged during shipping by their incompetence, unlike 2/3 of the electronics I ve had to return to them due to crappy packing, resulting in product damage. FYI, Amazon s packing department doesn t care if your products are damaged during shipping, so just expect that you may have to return anything electronic at least once. Which is sad, because if they took more care with their shipping department, they would not have as many returns due to product malfunctions:( 5Balance is where it's at.After 15 years of hard use, my old shure e5's have given up the ghost (the stiff cable came apart at the headphone jack joint...it hasn't broken yet, but they're not long for this world). So, i ordered these to replace those beloved e5's.With the e5's i used modified triple flange earpieces (trimmed off the smallest flange, and trimmed the stem back a bit for best fit). On the new phones, much to my amazement, the stock earpieces fit just fine. I will experiement more with the others later (including modifying the triple flanges that come with these).Out of the box...lots of different options for earpieces. Again, i was shocked that the stock actually work so well for me...but everyone's ears are different, and plenty of options are provided, as well as a volume control, airline and 1/8" to 1/4" headphone adapters. Much appreciated.I only got them today, and went directly from listening to my e5's to these. Initial impressions: even not broken in, they're pretty familiar-sounding, with a bit less "crowded" mids/highs. Bottom seems about the same...that is to say, balanced. If you want brain-scrambling, over-the-top bass, these probably won't work for you.As with any piece of reasonably hi-fi reproduction gear, if you're playing a less than ideal sounding production/file quality through them, they'll just show how less-than-ideal it really is. Well done stuff will sound pretty good.They're not the be-all, and-all, and will update this review when they've "opened up" after burn-in, but as a replacement for my old e5's for mobile listening, i'm well pleased with them thus far.[A week in] I found the stock tips to end up losing seal a bit to easily. So...i modified the triple flanges, the same way i have been with the e5's for years. That is to say, i trim off the smallest flange, and trim the stem to about 1mm past the rim of the first flange's edge. As with the e5's, the seal stays more consistent for me. For general use, this works really well. For stuff like airline flights, you'll probably want to use the foam tips for the better isolation.Since these are on detachable cables, it's weird figuring out which is the left or right earpiece, as they swivel on the cable connection. I'm probably just an idiot and missing a marking somewhere that determines left from right...but it's sort of weird not knowing right away which is which.Still very happy with the sound, and actually use the inline remote to prevent destructive bending of the cable relief bit of the earphones' jack...since my phone was often in my pocket, this is exactly what lead to the breakage on my e5's. The extra bit of replaceable cable is nice to have.I'll be flying with it at some point over the next week, so...more thoughts forthcoming!5Keepers. I initially auditioned wireless Shure SE 215 s. I love the warm signature, powerful bass & immersive soundstage that they provide. I was so impressed, I immediately became interested in the entire Shure SE line up.Online research suggested that the notable upgrades in the Shure SE line up are the 535 s or the 846 s.Technical research indicated that if IEM s have multiple balanced armatures, they can deliver bass that s comparable to or exceptional to those that have dynamic drivers. Additionally, it is also noted that multiple BA s can deliver more separation & detail.I referenced the 846 s, as they promise sub woofer bass, so they re extremely enticing. However, @ $1K, they re beyond my personal value, for now. So, I deferred to the 535 s.Just as research indicated, by comparison, the 535 s sounded more emotional, powerful & detailed. The bass was clean & controlled. The mid s & high s were forward & clear.In short, I found the overall sound signature to be significant enough to choose the 535 s over the 215 s.Keep in mind, everything begins with the input. Having said that, the output depends upon the studio recording & your device. My primary genre is electronica music via Spotify premium. My device is an iPhone 8 Plus. Nonetheless, if the recording is mediocre, the 535 s sound mediocre. By that same token, if the studio recording is stellar, so are the 535 s, as I can literally feel & see the music. It s a completely immersive & entertaining experience, if the recording is proper.My only concerns rests with the Bluetooth cable. I wish that the charge port was on the battery instead of the control button. I also wish that the battery had some sort of disconnect. However, the monitors disconnect, so there s that.In conclusion, with the exception of cost, there s really nothing wrong with the wireless 535 kit. So, cost is the only reason I rated them four stars instead of five.Notes: 1) The grey, medium, silicon tips offer the best seal & isolation in my experience. 2) The 215 s are the best value in the SE line up. 3). SE s sound even better when wired to a headphone amp.Choose wisely. 4Compared the Shure SE425, Bose SoundTrue Ultra in-ear, the Shure SE215, and the Shure SE535. Chose SE215 and switched to SE535Bose IE2i and Bose AE2I had a pair of Bose IE2i to listen to music when in my office, studying, running, gym, etc. I also had a pair of Bose AE2 that I used to play my electric drum set. I got tired of the IE2i and stopped using them altogether because those do not isolate any noises whatsoever. Like the new Bose SoundSport the earphone tips/buds are extremely comfortable, but you can hear every single noise from outside. I tried to use the IE2i in several 5-hr flights and they are useless. The AE2 sounded very good and isolated some noise. Enough to enjoy using them with my drumkit, but not enough to use on a plane ride.SE425Fantastic mid-range, poor bass and low-end; low impedance; long and strong cord; ability to replace only the cord if broken. Very comfortable behind-the-ear cord and position on the ear with great noise isolation. Given their lack of low-range these could not satisfy my needs. Expensive.Bose SoundTrue Ultra in-ear STIEGreat balanced sound; strong bass; short and thin/flimsy cord; includes iPhone controls. Very comfortable silicone tips that provide great noise isolation, but you can hear the cord touching against any surface. Easy and fast to take on/off. The earphones wiggle a bit when running, though not enough to break the sound seal. Relatively expensive.SE215Great balanced sound; strong bass; low impedance; long and strong cord, ability to replace only the cord if broken. Very comfortable behind-the-ear cord and position on the ear with great noise isolation. I can hear comfortably with 2/16 volume bars from the iPhone. Used 5/16 volume bars on the iPhone when running with 15 mph winds and was amazing. After a learning curve, you get used to quickly putting them on/off. Inexpensive.OverallI got the SE425 first and discarded them for their lack of bass. I couldn't notice much of a sound difference between the STIE and the SE215. The SE215 have a lower impedance and thus sound louder but the quality is, to me, quite comparable (My suggestion: get a tight seal, don't go too deep into your ear). The benefits of the SE215 suit my overall needs better and ended up choosing these.Notes1. I will post this same review in all three products hoping others will find it useful.2. I am traveling in a couple of days and if I find a good store in an airport that will let me try the SE535 I will make an update to this post. The SE535 are supposed to be as good as the SE425 with the bass that the latter so deeply lack.******UPDATE******A store at the Chicage O'Hare airport let me try the SE535. Here is my short review:SE535Fantastic balanced sound; great bass and low-end; low-enough impedance; long and strong cord, ability to replace only the cord if broken. Very comfortable behind-the-ear cord and position on the ear with great noise isolation. Many eartips to try for different occassions (e.g. biking, office, airplane). I can hear comfortably with 2/16 volume bars from the iPhone. With 3/16 volume bars on iPhone 5S the sound is astonishing, lead guitar doesn't sound over rythm guitar, bass and drums sound great and all sounds are complimenting one another as opposed to fighting over which is the primary sounding one. I use them for running, biking, skating, working out, in the office, at the library, coffee shop, in the car (passenger), on airplanes, and with my Roland TD30-KV electric drumkit. I never need more than 4/16 volume bars on my iPhone 5S. I specially like the versatility of these IEMs and quality of their sound. Expensive.I sincerely hope you find this review helpful!5Abysmal quality from a company tha couldn't care less.These IEM s sound great and fit comfortably, but that is where the good qualities end. I bought these in ear monitors at the same time as a hard case made by Otterbox. The case is so sturdy I can literally stand on it without any deformation or damage at all. I cared for these IEM s with with every possible precaution, gentle treatment, and careful use. When I wasn t using the IEM s they went directly into the otterbox case. I take care of everything I buy because I want to enjoy my purchases for, well, forever. I was using these headphones on a hot summer afternoon, took one out of my ear, reinserted it and it never worked again. There must have been a tiny, undetectable film of sweat in my ear which made its way into the guts of the IEM. To this day they look like they were just removed from the box, but only one works. The other sounds muffled with a very low volume. These IEM s are beyond fragile. I buy a *lot* of electronics and other things from Amazon and I can say without a doubt that these IEM s are at fault. I have many other pairs of headphones which all work like new...except one other pair - Shure SE 846 s. Guess what the problem with those is? One guess. Yep, a tiny bit of sweat and one IEM stopped working. Coincidence? Unlikely.1great sound but its complicated I really wanted to love these as I have heard so many good things. This was a big purchase for me so I was committed to giving them a fair shake. The sound quality is great, I don't think anyone who has the proper fit would disagree with that. My issues lie in the convenience area:1-changing cables between BT/standard is tricky, could result in damage, your fault.2-changing ear pieces, slightly tricky, could result in damage, your fault as well.3-fiiting in the ear takes time, same goes for removal, not fun when you are approached at work or on the train4-I use mac, so if I want to plug into iphone, adapter required, or $99 cable, same for lightning port $99, and even more for BT 5.0 $150.5-They seem to really struggle with crappy source file, much more than others. I would love to listen to vinyl with an amp all day but in reality I just don't. Most of my music is via phone or laptop, sometimes with a dac/amp if I am organized.6-I need to jump into Skype calls at work often and it would be great to do that but I did not have much success.Overall they sound very good but feel antiquated when it comes to daily use during real life, commute/office/home.All of these factors just make it too expensive for me, maybe a true audiophile would enjoy them more than me. When I had the choice I would always choose my B&W PX's, the sound is better (opinion) and the convenience factor is not even in the same league. Hope this is helpful to someone. 3Shure SE535 vs Etymotic ER4XR vs Etymotic hf3I felt compelled to write a review of these IEMs having obsessed about them for months now.They are all very good!They should be for the price! Haha.So where do I begin?Most important, above all is sound quality.They are all good with certain signature differences.I have been using Etymotics for years.Using the Etymotic hf3.Excellent overall. Very accurate. Just not a lot of punch or presence to the bass.It's there but doesn t hit you over the head.I tried other brands of phones and found them to sound inaccurate or sloppy.I had some older Shure IEMs and I wanted to see if their newer models sounded better.I tried the Shure SE315. and the Shure SE425.Didn t sound as good as my old model. Back they went.Decided I would need triple drivers to get a significantly better sound.Bought the Shure SE535. Lots of money!And wow! Very impressive!Having come from the Etymotics, the sound is very different.Its warmer and slicker sounding. The voice range is a little less forward, which may be simply because the bass presence and detail is huge compared to the Etymotics.The Shure SE535s are very entertaining to listen to.More so than the Etymotics.With the Shures, you feel more like you are being washed with music.With the Etymotics, it just feels more like you are analyzing the sound.There is way more punch and space to the sound in the Shure SE535s. Almost too much punch on certain tracks. Let me go back to the Etymotics.I tried out the Etymotic ER4XR and the Etymotic ER4SR.Very little discernible difference. Maybe slightly more bass presence with the XR.I have been using the Etymotic hf3 for many years.In my opinion, the hf3 sounds as good if not better than the ER4XR.The reason is that the ER4XR has a higher impedance than the hf3.On an iPhone, you have to turn up the volume essentially all the way to get the full sound out of the ER4XR.This is not the case with the hf3s. They are good at 3/4 volume.Makes a significant difference!Other than that, there is maybe a slightly discernible improvement in separation on the ER4XR. But I mean slight.Overall the hf3 sounds better. And they cost way less!And there is another point.Comfort.This is a tricky issue when it comes to IEMs.After trying to use the triple flange cone tips, I gave up do to discomfort and the scariness of sticking a little plastic Christmas tree up your ear canal.I found that using the cylindrical foam tips created just as good a sealed fit and bass response as the "tree" did. So that is what I use.The Soft Flex Sleeves are also an excellent alternative. Really good isolation and amazing bass response!That brings me to the difference between the Etymotics and the Shures.The Etymotics are simply more comfortable.The drivers are smaller and weigh less than the Shures. Less of a pull on your ear structure.Shures design is supposed to route the wire over and behind your ear.I find this distracting and annoying in addition to being uncomfortable.My solution is to let the wires remain in front of my ears, hanging down in front of me.Much more comfortable. (See photos)This however, necessitates using a shirt clip to cancel out the weight of the cord pulling on your ears. I bought some from Amazon. Works well to make the phones as weightless as possible.With the Etymotics, this is less of an issue because the earpieces weigh so much less and the foam goes straight into your ear canal.The Shures have to kind of sit on your ear structure. Not so comfortable.I'm hoping over time that I will be bothered less and less by this slight pressure.It is worth it to get the sonic results that the 535s deliver.Back to the Shures.I payed a very large amount for the 535s. For me they are worth it for the spectacular performance they deliver. I can only imagine how nice the Shure SE846s sound.I just couldn't bring myself to spend one thousand dollars on IEMs. I do after all have a family to support! So I am happy I have both.I will probably usually use my 535s for my daily commute to Manhattan.But it's nice to switch out to the Etymotics for a lighter more Spartan sound signature.Hope this review helps some of you out there.With streaming music, it's like being a kid in a candy store every day.And with these headphones, You can hear the candy really really well! Edit to this review: October 9, 2016This is an important addition to this review!I made a discovery about the importance of source input to the performance of the se535s.I had been listening to my music with Apple Music.I had been detecting a slight stridency to the overall sound of the headphones.Thought it was the phones.But then I tried using Spotify Premium with the 535s.No stridency!Virtually perfect reproduction of vocals, piano, strings, bass!As much as it pains me to say it, looks like Spotify delivers a more accurate dynamic signal.Both great music systems. But Spotify has a slightly warmer, more realistic sound.Wow!5it's like a concert on your headI'm an audiophile that likes to get out and walk around while listening to music, so I've always aimed to get the most I can out of portable equipment. Using my iPhone 6 Plus with Spotify and Tidal Lossless, I listened through a pair of Beyerdynamic DT-990s (250ohm) powered by a FiiO E12 I carry around in my back pocket. This setup, for me, remains unbeatable in terms of audio quality; it's like a concert on your head. But unforeseen circumstances made me seek out my first pair of IEMs in a long time.The last IEM I owned was the Klipsch Image S4, a popular one at the time that was widely praised for sounding 10x what it cost. But I knew I'd need something at least as good as my DT-990s if I really wanted to be satisfied; or at least, I'd need something that could give me that "Wow" when a song comes on I haven't heard before and I can hear every detail.I'll tell it to you straight, if you're a fan of open-back headphones - hell, any headphones that sit on your ears at all - odds are you aren't going to find an IEM that can live up to that experience, at least not without paying an insane price for it. At $500, the Shure SE535 should be the headphone that at least meets you halfway, and I can say that it just about does. But this is not an IEM with that "Wow!" factor.. actually it seems to be an actively anti-"Wow" pair of headphones. Take these out of the box and (after fiddling for several minutes) get them in your ear, the first thing you'll notice: they're damn comfortable for IEMs, mostly thanks to their smart but annoying design by which they basically hang on your ears. Now, turn on your favorite song, here it comes!... annnd... fizzle. Wait... what is this? Is this what I paid $500 for..? Are you kidding me?! This is the point where you have to have a little patience, giving your brain time to adjust to the new sound and the headphones time to show you what they can really do. Two words that should be printed on the bottom of the box: Keep Listening. Play song after song, and oddly enough, you'll find they start sounding better and better, and the SE535's character really starts to come out. The most forward, gorgeous rocking mids I've heard in probably any pair of headphones. The highs are so wonderfully detailed and flavorful, when singers hit those super high notes that would normally make you cringe in fear of pain, you instead feel an almost orgasmic sensation in the center of your brain, like their voice is reaching all the way into your brain and bouncing around in your skull. The lows and bass are understated, but certainly there, and they come out when they need to.. but hardly ever otherwise. This kind of sound profile actually has the unusual effect of making old, say pre-1940s vinyl recordings and mono mixes, sound amazing; listening to Jimmie Rodgers yodeling T For Texas sounds like having him right in front of you (don't let him sneeze on you). I was impressed by how much character these IEMs have, despite my initial disappointment that they didn't live up to my (perhaps absurd) expectations. All in all, I'll just break it down into pros and cons, so you can decide for yourself whether these are right for you in 2015.Pros:-Quite comfortable, and the box includes a ton of different ear tips to choose from. The box, by the way, includes many useful accessories, like cables and a well built hard case that can easily fit in your pocket.-Orgasmic mids and highs-Great soundstage for an IEM with good isolation as well, a rare combination.-Full of character, but not overstated; the music sounds fun, without compromising the detail.Cons:-Same design that makes it so comfortable makes it incredibly annoying to put on, as you have to lay the cord over your ear; this becomes profoundly more irritating if you have long hair.-Lows are understated and this seems to cost on sharpness and detail; instruments, for example, are more difficult to tell apart despite the 535's good soundstage. Bass is there, but has little punch or character.-A little too expensive for what you're getting. But this is also the best IEM I've ever owned, and I haven't owned many.Recommendations:I strongly recommend using an amplifier with the 535. It will bring out MUCH more detail and really push the IEMs to their full advantage. Not all headphones, particularly IEMs, benefit from amping but these definitely do. The lacking of bass can be corrected entirely with a proper amp, and the 535 handles a thumping bass excellently. I'm using the FiiO E12 I was using previously with my DT-990s, which is sort of overkill for a pair of IEMs, but it does sound heavenly- just be sure to be careful with the volume on any amplifier, as the 535's are low impendence and don't need much juice to get them going.4Best earphones, but disappointed that for the high price the in-line volume control doesn't work with Galaxy S7 Edge These are my third Shure earphones. First purchase was the SE530PTH back in 2010. Upgraded to SE535-CL in 2012. I fly a lot and usually on long flights (10+ hours) and found these to be the best for sound, comfort, and for blocking out all the noise on a plane. I like that they are in-ear and not over the ear like other noise-cancelling headphones. I often fall asleep on a plane while listening to music. I can get comfortable and twist and turn and not have to worry about what position my head is in. I've tried the Bose and Sennheiser earbuds and think the Shure are much better for sound and fit.Shure's customer service is great. Over the past 8 years I've only had a couple of issues. Fortunately, it happened while the earphones were covered by their warranty. Shure replaced earphone assemblies without any hassle. I lost my SE535-CL last week and had to get them replaced before my next trip. I decided to pay $50 more to get the limited edition SE535LTD because they have a slim volume control in the photo on Amazon. The SE530PTH I bought back in 2010 had volume controls, but they were very bulky.The SE535LTD comes with 2 sets of cables. One has the slim in-line volume controls and one with a single button for "Media phones". There's isn't a cable with no controls. First improvement I noticed were with the new cables. They aren't as stiff as the SE535-CL cables and there's a nice bend in the connector (see photo). The bent connector rests comfortably on my ear, and the softer cables go over and behind my ear without having to tug on them. With the previous cables I had to occasionally tug them down to keep them over my ear. It comes with a bunch accessories including different sleeves, an adapter for the 2-pin plugs found on some aircraft, and an analog volume control. I used them for a couple hours with my Galaxy S7 Edge and, as expected, they sound great.That being said, I can only give the SE535LTD 4 stars. I'm annoyed that for the super high price, Shure still doesn't include a cable with in-line volume controls that work with Android phones. One cable has only one button and is meant for placing calls (no volume controls). The other cable with the in-line volume control buttons only work with iPhones. I understand that back in 2010 iPhones had these fancy features and the Android phones didn't. It's 2018 and you can get in-line volume controls with cheap $10 earbuds, but I can't get them in my $500 Shure earphones? The analog volume control Shure provides is clunky and it's on a short "leash" (see photo). I would like to control the volume without having to pull my phone out my backpack or coat pocket. I would give the SE535LTD 5 stars if it wasn't for the lack of a good volume control option. 4Incredible sound from a tiny device I've had my eye on the Shure SE846 for a long time, but it's hard to justify spending close to $1k on an IEM I'll only use when I travel with my iPhone. Even worse; with the SE846, I'd be tempted to buy a Chord Mojo DAC for another $600, making my setup even less portable. With the SE535 however, my Audioquest Dragonfly Black is perfectly adequate, or perhaps I'll eventually give Shure's RMCE-LTG a try once they solve the problems with durability.The Shure SE535 costs about half as much as the flagship SE846 IEM, but scores only slightly lower in most IEM reviews. The main difference is that the 846 has an extra driver, which vastly improves low-end bass. If your tastes tend toward hip hop, that might be important to you - but serious audiophiles generally care more about accurate music reproduction, and in that the SE535 really excels. Not that I don't appreciate the presence afforded by an open low-end, but I'm not likely to notice it while riding a bus or subway.Even without a full sub-bass, the SE535 provides an exceptionally flat frequency response over the full range of human hearing. Music reproduction is crisp and accurate, and the array of ear tips provided virtually ensures a good, comfortable fit. Sound isolation is excellent and call quality is adequate. The SE545LTD only comes in red, which looks outstanding. The included BT1 bluetooth module is kind of a waste but it doesn't add to the cost, so I consider it basically a throw-away module that one might save for when they absolutely, positively must have wireless. Since it doesn't use Apt-X or ACC, sound quality with bluetooth is sub-par - but newer compatible bluetooth modules are readily available, including the BT2 from Shure. Still, a wired connection just plain sounds better. 5Excellent but probably not worth the moneyI've been using Shure in-ear earphones for a little over a decade, starting with the E2C, then the SE315, and now the SE535. I enjoyed my E2C pair so much but I wore out the over-the-ear memory cable resulting in a need to get something new. Having been on a tight budget about 7-8 years ago, I went with the SE315 but felt like those were a step down from the E2C. I used the SE315 pair until I recently lost the entire left earpiece from the detachable cable. So, now with some disposable income, I went back and forth between the SE425 and the SE535 and selected the latter.I've now had the SE535 pair (matched with an EarSudio ES100 bluetooth receiver/amp and a 2.5mm MMCX balanced cable) for about 3 months of moderate/casual listening time and couldn't be happier. Looking back, I'm not sure I'd do all that again, though. Like anything, there's a point of diminishing returns and I simply do not have the ears, time, or ability to care that much about getting the sound THIS good. I could have easily been just as happy with the SE425 and Shure's matching bluetooth cable for about half the price.As compared with the SE315, they're a little larger in size but they sound quite a bit better. The low frequencies the SE315 sometimes lacked the SE535 bring more forward, but in a very musical way. They're certainly not "boomy" and won't do justice to urban or EDM stuff with lots of heavy, hard-hitting bass. With the right setup, they're EXCELLENT at anything acoustic and you'll hear subtle detail that you might have missed on lesser setups, including some of the best home (and, arguably, studio) rigs.There are a few keys to getting the best performance out of the SE535, though, as I mentioned above. First, you'll need to make sure you get a good seal with the ear tips. If you don't have that, everything else you do and have won't to you any good. Personally, I find the large rubber tips to work best for me. However, the package includes a number of sizes of different types of tips, including expanding foam, rubber gasket, and a single pair of tri-flange earplug-style tips. Try them all until you get a comfortable fit AND a good seal in your ear. The next step up is to get custom ear molds done by an audiologist. It'll give you the best fit and you'll never have a problem with a seal. However, this option is quite expensive and would really only be needed by someone that can't find a good, comfortable fit with the existing ear tips (or a professional who would be getting the SE845 or something MUCH more custom, in general). Second, you'll want a good system to power the SE535s. Most smartphone headphone amps aren't going to do a good enough job. Also, most older bluetooth adapters, even Shure's older BT1, pair at a lower quality connection that will be obvious if you're using good enough equipment through the rest of the chain (and I did when switching from the SE315 to the SE535). Shure's BT2 would probably be a minimum to use with the SE535. However, I went with a 2.5mm balanced MMCX cable and the EarStudio ES100. It's got a powerful amp that really brings out detail in a way I haven't heard, even on my elaborate, studio-grade setup at home.Anyway, if you have the money for them, and the supporting equipment to really make them shine, you will be VERY happy with them. If you're just looking for a pair of earphones for casual listening, the SE425 is probably a better choice for your money.5
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