• Celestron  1.25 Eyepiece and Filter Accessory Kit  14 Piece Telescope Accessory Set  Plossl Telescope Eyepiece  Barlow Lens  Colored Filters  Moon Filter  Sturdy Metal Carry Case
  • Celestron  1.25 Eyepiece and Filter Accessory Kit  14 Piece Telescope Accessory Set  Plossl Telescope Eyepiece  Barlow Lens  Colored Filters  Moon Filter  Sturdy Metal Carry Case
  • Celestron  1.25 Eyepiece and Filter Accessory Kit  14 Piece Telescope Accessory Set  Plossl Telescope Eyepiece  Barlow Lens  Colored Filters  Moon Filter  Sturdy Metal Carry Case
Celestron  1.25 Eyepiece and Filter Accessory Kit  14 Piece Telescope Accessory Set  Plossl Telescope Eyepiece  Barlow Lens  Colored Filters  Moon Filter  Sturdy Metal Carry Case
Celestron  1.25 Eyepiece and Filter Accessory Kit  14 Piece Telescope Accessory Set  Plossl Telescope Eyepiece  Barlow Lens  Colored Filters  Moon Filter  Sturdy Metal Carry Case
Celestron  1.25 Eyepiece and Filter Accessory Kit  14 Piece Telescope Accessory Set  Plossl Telescope Eyepiece  Barlow Lens  Colored Filters  Moon Filter  Sturdy Metal Carry Case

Celestron 1.25 Eyepiece and Filter Accessory Kit 14 Piece Telescope Accessory Set Plossl Telescope Eyepiece Barlow Lens Colored Filters Moon Filter Sturdy Metal Carry Case

SKU:HA006RH5I
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  • 5 SUPERIOR-GRADE PLOSSL EYEPIECES: Our Celestron Accessory Kit includes five Plossl telescope eyepieces, ranging from low to high power: 32mm, 17mm, 13mm, 8mm, and 6mm. Each eyepiece features a four-element design with a 52-degree field of view.
  • 2X BARLOW LENS: The 2x Barlow lens can be easily paired with each of the five eyepieces in this kit (or any 1.25 eyepiece) to enhance your view and instantly double its magnification for even more power. Its like having 10 telescope eyepieces in your collection
  • COLORED FILTERS FOR ASTRONOMICAL VIEWING: Colored filters are perfect for bringing out various details on a planets surface or in its cloud structure.
  • DURABLE HARD-SIDED CARRYING CASE: Your kit will remain safe in a protective metal, foam-lined carrying lens filter case, perfect for organizing each piece and keeping your equipment ready to use.
  • UNBEATABLE WARRANTY AND CUSTOMER SUPPORT: Buy with confidence from the worlds number 1 telescope brand, based in California since 1960. Youll also receive a two-year warranty and unlimited access to technical support from our team of US-based experts.

Customer Reviews

Get a Zoom and a Barlow instead. I have had and used this set for many years. It gives you a set of starter eye pieces to learn what magnifications show what and includes a Barlow. the 32mm Plossl isn't bad, and the 17 mmis ok, the 13mm is tolerable. The 8 and 6 are like looking through pinholes. The Barlow adds color (thats not a good thing) but is otherwise usable. If you need to wear eyeglasses, forget it. I don't wear glasses and I still had a rough time. The filters are all but useless. The box is nice. Honestly, if I had a time machine to tell me what to get all those years ago I would have gone with a zoom eyepiece and a barlow instead. it would have been cheaper and much more useful for the purposes of a beginner. All in all the set is not terrible, but there are much better values for the money. 3I've had these less than 6 months and I'm already buying better lenses because these just aren't that great if you ... This set is alright if you don't want to spend a lot and don't really need high quality eye pieces. The 32mm and 17mm are the two I use the most. The filters seem alright but you'll probably only use the moon filter. I've had these less than 6 months and I'm already buying better lenses because these just aren't that great if you want good views. If you want to look up close at star clusters, galaxies or planets get a 8mm and a 3x barlow lense or a 7mm luminos and a 2x barlow. I plan on upgrading all of my eye pieces and giving these to my niece. 4Way too expensive -- for items you won't use. I've been an amateur astronomer for over 50 years. Plus, I've tested and reviewed telescopes, accessories, and eyepieces for major companies, so I'm pretty sure I know what to look for and recommend. There's good and bad stuff out there, and it isn't always easy for novices to get a grip on the difference, without either using an item, or finding an accurate report about it.First of all folks, please know that a "lens" is the glass on the business-end of a refractor telescope, or the optic on your CAMERA. The thing you attach to a telescope is called an "EYEPIECE" -- not a "lens".Secondly, any "set" of eyepieces is generally going to be 90 percent useless. That's because most of the higher powered eyepieces in the set will only get used once or twice -- until you finally realize that high powers are only useful on a telescope if you're in a VERY DARK LOCATION, with almost perfect sky conditions (an extremely rare combination!).These eyepieces are all 4-element Plossl's -- a very old and very basic design, but very tried-and-true for general observing. The 32mm is the best in the set, and probably the one you'll use the most.The 2X Barlow is of average quality, but can be very useful -- it'll turn the 32mm into a 16mm without cutting eye-relief (good, if you wear glasses).The Moon filter is a necessity if you want to do any lunar observing. Only one or two of the color filters will be useful.So what we have here, is one useful eyepiece, a 2X Barlow, a Moon filter, and a color filter or two -- for which you'd pay a lot less by purchasing just those items SEPERATELY. And if you shop smart, you'll find a high-quality 32mm Plossl and a 2X Barlow -- Televue for example, are hands-down the best production optics available! They're generally more expensive, but well worth the investment.Celestron makes excellent telescopes!! My 6SE is a remarkable piece of engineering, and has World Class optics. But I use eyepieces of World Class quality to complement it, and I get awesome results.[NOTE]: These are not Celestron's "Feature" eyepieces -- they are their "accessory" eyepieces, and like Meade's accessory EP's they are only of average quality, and are usually way overpriced, like most Meade/Celestron accessories.My advice is to save for a Televue 32mm or 25mm Plossl, ($110 to $135 online) and 2X Barlow, ($115) and buy a Moon filter online from a reputable dealer (Orion offers an excellent Moon filter [#05662] for about $15, which I've been using since 1997). It'll all work out to cost a little more, but you'll find that you'll actually use them.[NOTE]: I rarely use color-filters. But the ones I do use are the Orion #80A and #82A. You won't need much more for general observing.[TIP]: The best way to store and carry eyepieces, is in "Eyepiece Canisters" -- clear poly screw-top containers made for that purpose. They're available online (I get mine from Oceanside Photo & Telescope) for $2 to $3 each. Put them all in a backpack or travel bag, along with your red flashlight, dew heaters, gloves, and Lance crackers. Much easier!! Better yet, I use a shooter's Range Bag (from MidwayUSA). They have roomy external zippered pockets and internal compartments. Plus they're well padded. Perfect!!Celestron Accessory KitNOT RECOMMENDED2 Stars. 2More or Less Useful Adequate as a starter set.The 2x Barlow is worthless. The two most useful pieces in the kit are the Moon filter and the 32mm eyepiece which is useful for sighting the finder scope. Once the finder scope is properly aligned on target, I do not usually pace through the intermediate steps represented by the additional eyepieces (17mm, 13mm, 8mm, 6mm). I usually go directly to my Orion 3.0mm Planetary viewing eyepiece or my Vixen 2.4mm High Resolution eyepiece (not included in this kit). The remaining pieces can be of use depending the telescope aperture.I use a 150mm aperture / 750mm focal length scope which renders the eyepieces in this set as low power (17mm and 13mm) and medium power (8mm and 6mm) for high power, I must go outside this set and use the Orion 3.0mm and the Vixen 2.4mm eyepieces.With a 150mm aperture and 750mm focal length, the eyepieces in this set provide the following magnification (750 / Eyepiece). The maximum theoretical magnification of my 150mm aperture scope is 354.33x = (150mm X .0393701) X 60.32mm = 23x17mm = 44x13mm = 58x 8mm = 94x 6mm = 125xThe standard selection of color filters included are adequate and provide a good start to a filter collection if one is starting with no filters.The case itself is study but does not have much additional room for expansion and the foam interior is not easy to work with in terms of creating new holding slots. 3Solid Value for the Money I picked up this set of eyepieces and filters after first getting the Celestron Powerseeker Accessory kit with the 15mm and 9mm Kellner eyepieces to go with my Celestron Powerseeker 80EQ (refractor) and Powerseeker 127EQ (reflector) telescopes in order to gain a feel for how the different sizes of eyepieces worked before taking a big plunge and getting a larger set like this one with more options and advantages with the Plossl type of eyepieces. I did my homework before buying and calculated out the maximum magnifications that both telescopes could support in terms of stand-alone eyepieces or in combination with the included 2x Barlow and all of the set's eyepieces were within the limits of the 80EQ refractor as standalone but beyond the 13mm couldn't be used with the 2x Barlow (the 127EQ reflector could use up to the 8mm + 2x Barlow) and still focus sharply, so bear that in mind when considering this set relative to your own telescope's capability/limitations.Since I have astigmatism and prefer to keep my glasses on when doing observations whenever possible, the biggest advantages of this set have come from using the 32mm, 17mm, and 13mm Plossl eyepieces alone or in combination with the 2x Barlow to get the clearest and most comfortable views. These have proven to be superior to the Kellners I picked up originally and are now my go-to choice for observations. The 32mm is particularly useful for star-hopping and locating what I'm looking for before getting a closer look with either the Barlow or one of the smaller eyepieces and then stacking the Barlow to get even closer views. The multi-coated lenses deliver outstanding clarity for both planetary and stellar observations and I'm very pleased with them as a result. I've combined these with a star diagonal in the refractor and have been successful in observing several Messier objects as well as some splitting out various double and triple stars at high power magnification along with the usual nice views of the Moon, Jupiter's cloud bands and moons, crescent views of Venus, etc. The smaller 8mm and 6mm eyepieces have proven less useful due mostly to eye relief issues and magnification limits but are still good eyepieces to round out the set and provide some options for those who don't have to contend with eyeglass interference like I do. I've used a clock motor drive with them effectively to keep items of interest within the field of view at higher magnifications and allow my eye to 'roam' around freely and see more as a result.The filters that the set includes are a nice value-add, but the best of the lot has proven to be the Neutral Density (ND) Moon filter. It provides sharper views and greater detail than the 'green' Moon filter that comes in the Powerseeker Accessory kit in my opinion and is a marked improvement for sure as it keeps the moon's natural color without adding the green tinge while still reducing the brightness to bearable levels even when beyond Half Moon stage. I've played around with the various planetary filters mostly while viewing Jupiter and didn't really see a huge added improvement with the various filters but they are there as an added bonus. The real value of the set is definitely in the eyepieces and the multi-coated 2x Barlow.The case is also very handy, just the right size, lightweight but durable due to the aluminum construction. The foam inside is typical egg crate type cushioning foam. I've modified the foam inside slightly to accommodate all of my eyepieces (including the Kellners from the earlier set) and my night-vision red LED flashlight so everything all fits in one box.All in all, I'm very pleased with the set and the expanded capability it provides for the price. It's given me a very solid foundation to work from should I decide to go all-out in the future and buy specialized eye-pieces to further compliment this broad range of options I now have with this set in the collection. 5Save your money, get better eyepieces. I got this kit when I first got my Celestron SCT a while back. At the time it seemed OK, since I hadn't bought a telescope since the 1980s, and the 1.25" eyepieces seemed massive compared to the small Japanese eyepieces of the past. It was awesome at first, but I now wish I had not sprung for this, and directed the funds toward better optical equipment. The Pl ssl design eyepieces in this case are of average quality, and the low mag 32mm Pl ssl eyepiece is a bit better. The high mag eyepieces, the 6mm and 8mm, are of the lowest quality, and I found significant aberrations in the glass, enough so that images of planets "jump about" as you move your eye around the eyepiece. This is to be expected for eyepieces of this price point. The Barlow doubler works OK, but introduces some vignetting, and reduces contrast a little too much. If your scope and mount can accommodate a 2-inch diagonal or focuser, and your rig can handle the increased weight, my advice would be to go with eyepieces having a 2-inch barrel, and a good 2-inch diagonal if you need it. Depending on your setup, you might need to buy some adapter pieces. Then you can purchase high, medium, and low power eyepieces (just 3) and a Barlow or Powermate. That will end up costing around $500 to $2000, depending on how much you want those big heavy expensive eyepieces. Baader Planetarium, for example, makes excellent eyepieces that will keep your expenditures at the lower end, keep your equipment weight down, and give you views that you can really appreciate. 2Nice little kit... I don't have much to compare this product to as I am new to telescopes and just getting to know the basics. What I can say is this kit seems like it brings out the best in an amateurs backyard space exploration. I am absolutely positive that this is NOT the best set available on the market based off of product feedback and general knowledge but it will definitely be a nice finishing touch to those who are attempting to get the most out of their scope. For those that are new to this and wondering what exactly everything does, *You can probably stop reading by now if you have a general experience of how scopes/lenses/filters work*. General Information For Newbies like myself: (Don't trust me word for word this is only from my understanding)The barlow lens attaches to the scope that you can then place any other lens into the barlow to get essentially a 2x magnification level.The size in MM of the lens represents its magnification power. The shorter the lens (Small MM) the more magnification. a 13mm lens is more "powerful" than a 32mm lens. (Don't let the physical size fool you).The planetary filters alter the contrast of the image and help show "features" of objects that you otherwise wouldn't/couldn't see, they also do a good job at filtering out excess light so that you can actually see what you are looking at rather than having it seem to be looking at pretty much the same object no matter what planet or star you are on (for those that have weaker scopes).The moon filter is very nice at reducing the light as described. Makes things much more enjoyable and easy on the eye. I noticed after viewing the moon for a while without the filter I couldn't see much of what was around me being so dark out. The filter really reduced that effect.Tips: Experiment around a little, don't be discouraged if you can't get it all figured out in one night and find your way to all of the planets and stars. As helpful as the filters can be they can also hurt. For faint objects through a low powered scope it can make some objects barely visible at best depending on visual magnitude. Remember the smaller the lens in size and MM the bigger the power. That also happens to mean that you might get a much more distorted/fuzzy image and objects WILL be harder to locate. I don't have a fancy "GOTO" scope (one that finds whatever you want it to for you). I've learned through the small amount of experience that I have to start with a higher number MM lens and find what I'm looking for and then change out the lens carefully and slowly and fine tune as needed... The 8mm and especially 6mm lenses are virtually useless to me as I haven't been able to get them trained and tuned on anything. (This might be due to my "cheaper" scope).Final Thought: The eye relief has much room for improvement... Most of the time with the short lenses the only thing I saw was my own eyelashes... Another reason the short lenses haven't helped me out. (eye relief gets better with the longer lenses, and for those that don't know it's the amount of space between the actual lens and your eye). Hence, if you have your eye pressed against the lens you might see your pretty little batty eyelashes instead of the cosmos.Good luck and see you at Saturns rings! ;) 4A Great Buy!!! I've been eyeing this kit ever since I bought my first telescope just over a year and a half ago (Celestron PowerSeeker 114EQ). I got that one used from the warehouse, it came in almost new condition (in fact, I would not have known the difference if I didn't make the purchase).The same is true here, all original packaging, however it was missing the keys, which I did not plan on using anyways, and it was also missing the filter guide (which is a non issue, really. This is why Google exists).The eyepieces themselves are very nice, metal barrels that are a very tight fit in my scope. I mention this because the two beginner EPs that came with the 114EQ are loose fitting and plastic.The glass is very clear, only viewed a church steeple a mile away (it was cloudy last night when I received them, will update once I view the sky with these). Image was very clear across all sizes. The barrels are threaded for filters, which screw in very nicely. Again, will update this section later.UPDATE: Was able to do some observing with these: the clarity is astounding compared to my beginners. I was able to distinctly see the individual stars in the Orion Nebula, specifically the four star group in the middle of it. Before, I could only just make our that I was seeing M42.A huge plus: the EPs are set to (almost) the same focus, so you don't have to refocus much when switching lenses, unlike the beginner EPs.Other thoughts: The case has enough space to hold my laser collimator, my other two EPs and barlow, as well as my mini screwdriver that I use for collimation.tl;dr: HUGE value, great quality, highly recommended to build your EP collection. I cannot be pleased enough with this acquisition!!! 5The case is awesome. The barlow lens made me giggle for joy ... I'm new to telescopes, take my 5 star with that in mind. I did find this kit made a HUGE difference. The case is awesome. The barlow lens made me giggle for joy when I saw Saturn seemingly double in size (first time ever using a barlow). The wide range of eyepieces really help you locate an object with a wide field of view, then progressively zoom in as you re-center the image in each eyepiece. Really helped me snag my first photo of Saturn's rings just putting my iPhone up to the eyepiece. I don't really get color filters yet. I know the moon filter will be helpful, as all my moon photos have been accessively bright. Tried the yellow one on Saturn and couldn't tell a difference (well I mean Saturn was yellow, but I couldn't see any extra details). Case has extra room for the other few accessories I have that didn't have a home. Really love this kit! 5Fantastic Set At A Super Price This is an amazing price for this many eyepieces and filters. These are high quality Plossl (4 elements) eyepieces. The selection of filters is about all you will ever need. I haven't used my telescope for a while and managed to lose the eyepieces so I bought this set. These are better quality eyepieces than I originally had so it was fortuitous.Plossl eyepieces sell for around $40.00 each, and the Barlow costs about the same, so 5 eyepieces and a Barlow bought individually would cost about $240.00. Filter prices range all over the place depending on quality. The cheapest I found was a set of six filters from Orion for $120.00. Don't forget to add in the padded case for about $50.00 to arrive at $410.00. While this set offers great savings, the advertised claim that the value is over $700.00 is greatly exaggerated. However, a $280.00 saving is still a great deal.For the novice. magnification is calculated by dividing the focal length of the Mirror (reflector) or Primary lens (refractor) by the focal length of the eyepiece. For example, my telescope has a focal length of 1,000 mm (1 inch = 25.4 mm), so the 32 mm eyepiece gives me 1,000/32 = 31x. Perfect for looking at nebulae like those found in Orion. At the other extreme, the 6 mm lens gives 167x, and the Barlow doubles that to 334, good for studying Mars (If the planetwide dust storm ever settles).I recommend buying these other items to enhance your experience.1) I use a medium sized refractor for most of my observations so a diagonal prism for ease of viewing is almost essential. Reflectors don't really need diagonals because of the position of the eyepiece. The one I bought is "Meade Instruments #918A 1.25-Inch Diagonal Prism." for $29.99. Here is the link: https://amazon.com/gp/product/B0006NAS8K/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=12) A light pollution filter if you live in an area with a lot of street lights. there are some very expensive ones, but, I bought the "Gosky 1.25 Inch Light Pollution Filter for Telescope" for $19.99. Here is the link: https://amazon.com/gp/product/B01LGZNMGG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=13) Optional, 4mm eyepiece for higher magnification. Most complete sets of eyepieces have the 4 mm eyepiece, so I was surprised it was not in this set. No matter, it is still a fantastic set. I bought the "Celestron Omni Series 1-1/4 4MM Eyepiece" for $23.00. Here is the link: https://amazon.com/gp/product/B00008Y0S5/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1The case has a couple of slots cut out in the foam liner for the addition of extra pieces. Using the cutouts you can store the extra filter, eyepiece, and diagonal in the case. I removed the foam from the filter area to store the extra filter and as luck would have it, it was the perfect length to use as a spacer between the diagonal and the extra eyepiece (eyepiece hasn't arrived yet). You can always cut the foam that you remove from the large cutout area, it was just nice to have the perfect fit. As you can see from the photo (Amazon rotated it 90 degrees) it all fits nicely.This is the perfect set for casual astronomy buffs who don't want to mortgage their houses to buy astronomy equipment. Since it's Celestron, you can count on it being good quality. 5
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Description
  • 5 SUPERIOR-GRADE PLOSSL EYEPIECES: Our Celestron Accessory Kit includes five Plossl telescope eyepieces, ranging from low to high power: 32mm, 17mm, 13mm, 8mm, and 6mm. Each eyepiece features a four-element design with a 52-degree field of view.
  • 2X BARLOW LENS: The 2x Barlow lens can be easily paired with each of the five eyepieces in this kit (or any 1.25 eyepiece) to enhance your view and instantly double its magnification for even more power. Its like having 10 telescope eyepieces in your collection
  • COLORED FILTERS FOR ASTRONOMICAL VIEWING: Colored filters are perfect for bringing out various details on a planets surface or in its cloud structure.
  • DURABLE HARD-SIDED CARRYING CASE: Your kit will remain safe in a protective metal, foam-lined carrying lens filter case, perfect for organizing each piece and keeping your equipment ready to use.
  • UNBEATABLE WARRANTY AND CUSTOMER SUPPORT: Buy with confidence from the worlds number 1 telescope brand, based in California since 1960. Youll also receive a two-year warranty and unlimited access to technical support from our team of US-based experts.
Reviews

Customer Reviews

Get a Zoom and a Barlow instead. I have had and used this set for many years. It gives you a set of starter eye pieces to learn what magnifications show what and includes a Barlow. the 32mm Plossl isn't bad, and the 17 mmis ok, the 13mm is tolerable. The 8 and 6 are like looking through pinholes. The Barlow adds color (thats not a good thing) but is otherwise usable. If you need to wear eyeglasses, forget it. I don't wear glasses and I still had a rough time. The filters are all but useless. The box is nice. Honestly, if I had a time machine to tell me what to get all those years ago I would have gone with a zoom eyepiece and a barlow instead. it would have been cheaper and much more useful for the purposes of a beginner. All in all the set is not terrible, but there are much better values for the money. 3I've had these less than 6 months and I'm already buying better lenses because these just aren't that great if you ... This set is alright if you don't want to spend a lot and don't really need high quality eye pieces. The 32mm and 17mm are the two I use the most. The filters seem alright but you'll probably only use the moon filter. I've had these less than 6 months and I'm already buying better lenses because these just aren't that great if you want good views. If you want to look up close at star clusters, galaxies or planets get a 8mm and a 3x barlow lense or a 7mm luminos and a 2x barlow. I plan on upgrading all of my eye pieces and giving these to my niece. 4Way too expensive -- for items you won't use. I've been an amateur astronomer for over 50 years. Plus, I've tested and reviewed telescopes, accessories, and eyepieces for major companies, so I'm pretty sure I know what to look for and recommend. There's good and bad stuff out there, and it isn't always easy for novices to get a grip on the difference, without either using an item, or finding an accurate report about it.First of all folks, please know that a "lens" is the glass on the business-end of a refractor telescope, or the optic on your CAMERA. The thing you attach to a telescope is called an "EYEPIECE" -- not a "lens".Secondly, any "set" of eyepieces is generally going to be 90 percent useless. That's because most of the higher powered eyepieces in the set will only get used once or twice -- until you finally realize that high powers are only useful on a telescope if you're in a VERY DARK LOCATION, with almost perfect sky conditions (an extremely rare combination!).These eyepieces are all 4-element Plossl's -- a very old and very basic design, but very tried-and-true for general observing. The 32mm is the best in the set, and probably the one you'll use the most.The 2X Barlow is of average quality, but can be very useful -- it'll turn the 32mm into a 16mm without cutting eye-relief (good, if you wear glasses).The Moon filter is a necessity if you want to do any lunar observing. Only one or two of the color filters will be useful.So what we have here, is one useful eyepiece, a 2X Barlow, a Moon filter, and a color filter or two -- for which you'd pay a lot less by purchasing just those items SEPERATELY. And if you shop smart, you'll find a high-quality 32mm Plossl and a 2X Barlow -- Televue for example, are hands-down the best production optics available! They're generally more expensive, but well worth the investment.Celestron makes excellent telescopes!! My 6SE is a remarkable piece of engineering, and has World Class optics. But I use eyepieces of World Class quality to complement it, and I get awesome results.[NOTE]: These are not Celestron's "Feature" eyepieces -- they are their "accessory" eyepieces, and like Meade's accessory EP's they are only of average quality, and are usually way overpriced, like most Meade/Celestron accessories.My advice is to save for a Televue 32mm or 25mm Plossl, ($110 to $135 online) and 2X Barlow, ($115) and buy a Moon filter online from a reputable dealer (Orion offers an excellent Moon filter [#05662] for about $15, which I've been using since 1997). It'll all work out to cost a little more, but you'll find that you'll actually use them.[NOTE]: I rarely use color-filters. But the ones I do use are the Orion #80A and #82A. You won't need much more for general observing.[TIP]: The best way to store and carry eyepieces, is in "Eyepiece Canisters" -- clear poly screw-top containers made for that purpose. They're available online (I get mine from Oceanside Photo & Telescope) for $2 to $3 each. Put them all in a backpack or travel bag, along with your red flashlight, dew heaters, gloves, and Lance crackers. Much easier!! Better yet, I use a shooter's Range Bag (from MidwayUSA). They have roomy external zippered pockets and internal compartments. Plus they're well padded. Perfect!!Celestron Accessory KitNOT RECOMMENDED2 Stars. 2More or Less Useful Adequate as a starter set.The 2x Barlow is worthless. The two most useful pieces in the kit are the Moon filter and the 32mm eyepiece which is useful for sighting the finder scope. Once the finder scope is properly aligned on target, I do not usually pace through the intermediate steps represented by the additional eyepieces (17mm, 13mm, 8mm, 6mm). I usually go directly to my Orion 3.0mm Planetary viewing eyepiece or my Vixen 2.4mm High Resolution eyepiece (not included in this kit). The remaining pieces can be of use depending the telescope aperture.I use a 150mm aperture / 750mm focal length scope which renders the eyepieces in this set as low power (17mm and 13mm) and medium power (8mm and 6mm) for high power, I must go outside this set and use the Orion 3.0mm and the Vixen 2.4mm eyepieces.With a 150mm aperture and 750mm focal length, the eyepieces in this set provide the following magnification (750 / Eyepiece). The maximum theoretical magnification of my 150mm aperture scope is 354.33x = (150mm X .0393701) X 60.32mm = 23x17mm = 44x13mm = 58x 8mm = 94x 6mm = 125xThe standard selection of color filters included are adequate and provide a good start to a filter collection if one is starting with no filters.The case itself is study but does not have much additional room for expansion and the foam interior is not easy to work with in terms of creating new holding slots. 3Solid Value for the Money I picked up this set of eyepieces and filters after first getting the Celestron Powerseeker Accessory kit with the 15mm and 9mm Kellner eyepieces to go with my Celestron Powerseeker 80EQ (refractor) and Powerseeker 127EQ (reflector) telescopes in order to gain a feel for how the different sizes of eyepieces worked before taking a big plunge and getting a larger set like this one with more options and advantages with the Plossl type of eyepieces. I did my homework before buying and calculated out the maximum magnifications that both telescopes could support in terms of stand-alone eyepieces or in combination with the included 2x Barlow and all of the set's eyepieces were within the limits of the 80EQ refractor as standalone but beyond the 13mm couldn't be used with the 2x Barlow (the 127EQ reflector could use up to the 8mm + 2x Barlow) and still focus sharply, so bear that in mind when considering this set relative to your own telescope's capability/limitations.Since I have astigmatism and prefer to keep my glasses on when doing observations whenever possible, the biggest advantages of this set have come from using the 32mm, 17mm, and 13mm Plossl eyepieces alone or in combination with the 2x Barlow to get the clearest and most comfortable views. These have proven to be superior to the Kellners I picked up originally and are now my go-to choice for observations. The 32mm is particularly useful for star-hopping and locating what I'm looking for before getting a closer look with either the Barlow or one of the smaller eyepieces and then stacking the Barlow to get even closer views. The multi-coated lenses deliver outstanding clarity for both planetary and stellar observations and I'm very pleased with them as a result. I've combined these with a star diagonal in the refractor and have been successful in observing several Messier objects as well as some splitting out various double and triple stars at high power magnification along with the usual nice views of the Moon, Jupiter's cloud bands and moons, crescent views of Venus, etc. The smaller 8mm and 6mm eyepieces have proven less useful due mostly to eye relief issues and magnification limits but are still good eyepieces to round out the set and provide some options for those who don't have to contend with eyeglass interference like I do. I've used a clock motor drive with them effectively to keep items of interest within the field of view at higher magnifications and allow my eye to 'roam' around freely and see more as a result.The filters that the set includes are a nice value-add, but the best of the lot has proven to be the Neutral Density (ND) Moon filter. It provides sharper views and greater detail than the 'green' Moon filter that comes in the Powerseeker Accessory kit in my opinion and is a marked improvement for sure as it keeps the moon's natural color without adding the green tinge while still reducing the brightness to bearable levels even when beyond Half Moon stage. I've played around with the various planetary filters mostly while viewing Jupiter and didn't really see a huge added improvement with the various filters but they are there as an added bonus. The real value of the set is definitely in the eyepieces and the multi-coated 2x Barlow.The case is also very handy, just the right size, lightweight but durable due to the aluminum construction. The foam inside is typical egg crate type cushioning foam. I've modified the foam inside slightly to accommodate all of my eyepieces (including the Kellners from the earlier set) and my night-vision red LED flashlight so everything all fits in one box.All in all, I'm very pleased with the set and the expanded capability it provides for the price. It's given me a very solid foundation to work from should I decide to go all-out in the future and buy specialized eye-pieces to further compliment this broad range of options I now have with this set in the collection. 5Save your money, get better eyepieces. I got this kit when I first got my Celestron SCT a while back. At the time it seemed OK, since I hadn't bought a telescope since the 1980s, and the 1.25" eyepieces seemed massive compared to the small Japanese eyepieces of the past. It was awesome at first, but I now wish I had not sprung for this, and directed the funds toward better optical equipment. The Pl ssl design eyepieces in this case are of average quality, and the low mag 32mm Pl ssl eyepiece is a bit better. The high mag eyepieces, the 6mm and 8mm, are of the lowest quality, and I found significant aberrations in the glass, enough so that images of planets "jump about" as you move your eye around the eyepiece. This is to be expected for eyepieces of this price point. The Barlow doubler works OK, but introduces some vignetting, and reduces contrast a little too much. If your scope and mount can accommodate a 2-inch diagonal or focuser, and your rig can handle the increased weight, my advice would be to go with eyepieces having a 2-inch barrel, and a good 2-inch diagonal if you need it. Depending on your setup, you might need to buy some adapter pieces. Then you can purchase high, medium, and low power eyepieces (just 3) and a Barlow or Powermate. That will end up costing around $500 to $2000, depending on how much you want those big heavy expensive eyepieces. Baader Planetarium, for example, makes excellent eyepieces that will keep your expenditures at the lower end, keep your equipment weight down, and give you views that you can really appreciate. 2Nice little kit... I don't have much to compare this product to as I am new to telescopes and just getting to know the basics. What I can say is this kit seems like it brings out the best in an amateurs backyard space exploration. I am absolutely positive that this is NOT the best set available on the market based off of product feedback and general knowledge but it will definitely be a nice finishing touch to those who are attempting to get the most out of their scope. For those that are new to this and wondering what exactly everything does, *You can probably stop reading by now if you have a general experience of how scopes/lenses/filters work*. General Information For Newbies like myself: (Don't trust me word for word this is only from my understanding)The barlow lens attaches to the scope that you can then place any other lens into the barlow to get essentially a 2x magnification level.The size in MM of the lens represents its magnification power. The shorter the lens (Small MM) the more magnification. a 13mm lens is more "powerful" than a 32mm lens. (Don't let the physical size fool you).The planetary filters alter the contrast of the image and help show "features" of objects that you otherwise wouldn't/couldn't see, they also do a good job at filtering out excess light so that you can actually see what you are looking at rather than having it seem to be looking at pretty much the same object no matter what planet or star you are on (for those that have weaker scopes).The moon filter is very nice at reducing the light as described. Makes things much more enjoyable and easy on the eye. I noticed after viewing the moon for a while without the filter I couldn't see much of what was around me being so dark out. The filter really reduced that effect.Tips: Experiment around a little, don't be discouraged if you can't get it all figured out in one night and find your way to all of the planets and stars. As helpful as the filters can be they can also hurt. For faint objects through a low powered scope it can make some objects barely visible at best depending on visual magnitude. Remember the smaller the lens in size and MM the bigger the power. That also happens to mean that you might get a much more distorted/fuzzy image and objects WILL be harder to locate. I don't have a fancy "GOTO" scope (one that finds whatever you want it to for you). I've learned through the small amount of experience that I have to start with a higher number MM lens and find what I'm looking for and then change out the lens carefully and slowly and fine tune as needed... The 8mm and especially 6mm lenses are virtually useless to me as I haven't been able to get them trained and tuned on anything. (This might be due to my "cheaper" scope).Final Thought: The eye relief has much room for improvement... Most of the time with the short lenses the only thing I saw was my own eyelashes... Another reason the short lenses haven't helped me out. (eye relief gets better with the longer lenses, and for those that don't know it's the amount of space between the actual lens and your eye). Hence, if you have your eye pressed against the lens you might see your pretty little batty eyelashes instead of the cosmos.Good luck and see you at Saturns rings! ;) 4A Great Buy!!! I've been eyeing this kit ever since I bought my first telescope just over a year and a half ago (Celestron PowerSeeker 114EQ). I got that one used from the warehouse, it came in almost new condition (in fact, I would not have known the difference if I didn't make the purchase).The same is true here, all original packaging, however it was missing the keys, which I did not plan on using anyways, and it was also missing the filter guide (which is a non issue, really. This is why Google exists).The eyepieces themselves are very nice, metal barrels that are a very tight fit in my scope. I mention this because the two beginner EPs that came with the 114EQ are loose fitting and plastic.The glass is very clear, only viewed a church steeple a mile away (it was cloudy last night when I received them, will update once I view the sky with these). Image was very clear across all sizes. The barrels are threaded for filters, which screw in very nicely. Again, will update this section later.UPDATE: Was able to do some observing with these: the clarity is astounding compared to my beginners. I was able to distinctly see the individual stars in the Orion Nebula, specifically the four star group in the middle of it. Before, I could only just make our that I was seeing M42.A huge plus: the EPs are set to (almost) the same focus, so you don't have to refocus much when switching lenses, unlike the beginner EPs.Other thoughts: The case has enough space to hold my laser collimator, my other two EPs and barlow, as well as my mini screwdriver that I use for collimation.tl;dr: HUGE value, great quality, highly recommended to build your EP collection. I cannot be pleased enough with this acquisition!!! 5The case is awesome. The barlow lens made me giggle for joy ... I'm new to telescopes, take my 5 star with that in mind. I did find this kit made a HUGE difference. The case is awesome. The barlow lens made me giggle for joy when I saw Saturn seemingly double in size (first time ever using a barlow). The wide range of eyepieces really help you locate an object with a wide field of view, then progressively zoom in as you re-center the image in each eyepiece. Really helped me snag my first photo of Saturn's rings just putting my iPhone up to the eyepiece. I don't really get color filters yet. I know the moon filter will be helpful, as all my moon photos have been accessively bright. Tried the yellow one on Saturn and couldn't tell a difference (well I mean Saturn was yellow, but I couldn't see any extra details). Case has extra room for the other few accessories I have that didn't have a home. Really love this kit! 5Fantastic Set At A Super Price This is an amazing price for this many eyepieces and filters. These are high quality Plossl (4 elements) eyepieces. The selection of filters is about all you will ever need. I haven't used my telescope for a while and managed to lose the eyepieces so I bought this set. These are better quality eyepieces than I originally had so it was fortuitous.Plossl eyepieces sell for around $40.00 each, and the Barlow costs about the same, so 5 eyepieces and a Barlow bought individually would cost about $240.00. Filter prices range all over the place depending on quality. The cheapest I found was a set of six filters from Orion for $120.00. Don't forget to add in the padded case for about $50.00 to arrive at $410.00. While this set offers great savings, the advertised claim that the value is over $700.00 is greatly exaggerated. However, a $280.00 saving is still a great deal.For the novice. magnification is calculated by dividing the focal length of the Mirror (reflector) or Primary lens (refractor) by the focal length of the eyepiece. For example, my telescope has a focal length of 1,000 mm (1 inch = 25.4 mm), so the 32 mm eyepiece gives me 1,000/32 = 31x. Perfect for looking at nebulae like those found in Orion. At the other extreme, the 6 mm lens gives 167x, and the Barlow doubles that to 334, good for studying Mars (If the planetwide dust storm ever settles).I recommend buying these other items to enhance your experience.1) I use a medium sized refractor for most of my observations so a diagonal prism for ease of viewing is almost essential. Reflectors don't really need diagonals because of the position of the eyepiece. The one I bought is "Meade Instruments #918A 1.25-Inch Diagonal Prism." for $29.99. Here is the link: https://amazon.com/gp/product/B0006NAS8K/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=12) A light pollution filter if you live in an area with a lot of street lights. there are some very expensive ones, but, I bought the "Gosky 1.25 Inch Light Pollution Filter for Telescope" for $19.99. Here is the link: https://amazon.com/gp/product/B01LGZNMGG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=13) Optional, 4mm eyepiece for higher magnification. Most complete sets of eyepieces have the 4 mm eyepiece, so I was surprised it was not in this set. No matter, it is still a fantastic set. I bought the "Celestron Omni Series 1-1/4 4MM Eyepiece" for $23.00. Here is the link: https://amazon.com/gp/product/B00008Y0S5/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1The case has a couple of slots cut out in the foam liner for the addition of extra pieces. Using the cutouts you can store the extra filter, eyepiece, and diagonal in the case. I removed the foam from the filter area to store the extra filter and as luck would have it, it was the perfect length to use as a spacer between the diagonal and the extra eyepiece (eyepiece hasn't arrived yet). You can always cut the foam that you remove from the large cutout area, it was just nice to have the perfect fit. As you can see from the photo (Amazon rotated it 90 degrees) it all fits nicely.This is the perfect set for casual astronomy buffs who don't want to mortgage their houses to buy astronomy equipment. Since it's Celestron, you can count on it being good quality. 5
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